#1
i just bought a musicians institute guitar soloing book to help expand my learning beyond covering. and i dont quite understand what it is they are asking me to do and i've shown this book to a few people that play some guitar and they are stumpped too. so i hope someone out there can help.. the title of this page is called PLAYING MOVEABLE SCALE PATTERNS
its asking me to play a scale built around the E chord..And to shift the position of the pattern so the circled note(s) in the diagram or over the intended tonic. it shows the pattern on the board and where the root notes are but it ends there pretty much..I have other scale books but I cant seem to find what im looking for..So i guess what im asking is where should i begin on these patterns.. Thanks in advance

Chris
#2
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html


The articles this guy did some months back were the best i've read, made it easy to understand and most people seemed to agree. there's the first one for you, part 1 was just an introduction to what he was going to do. after you've read it click on view all under the other articles listed and choose part 3.
#3
If you have a scale pattern (or box, as I've seen it written), you can move that entire pattern over one fret, and when you play that scale patter, it'll be in a whole different key. And if you learned where the "one notes" (I'm sure these are the circled notes) are on the scale pattern, then in the new position, you'll find that those "one notes" are different, but still "one notes", if you get my meaning. I'm starting out myself, but definitely check out the lessons in the above post. Good luck!
#4
Quote by rich420
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html


The articles this guy did some months back were the best i've read, made it easy to understand and most people seemed to agree. there's the first one for you, part 1 was just an introduction to what he was going to do. after you've read it click on view all under the other articles listed and choose part 3.

+1

You need to understand scales themselves if you want to make effective use of the patterns they form on the fretboard. The patterns help you use the scale, but teach you very little about it so they're best left until you've got yourself some background knowledge.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Quote by steven seagull
You need to understand scales themselves if you want to make effective use of the patterns they form on the fretboard. The patterns help you use the scale, but teach you very little about it so they're best left until you've got yourself some background knowledge.


In theory this is how it should work.

In practice it's the opposite.
#6
Quote by guitarviz
In theory this is how it should work.

In practice it's the opposite.

It works in practice too, it's just that most people seem to approach it the wrong way then post in here wondering why they aren't getting anywhere.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#7
Quote by steven seagull
+1

You need to understand scales themselves if you want to make effective use of the patterns they form on the fretboard. The patterns help you use the scale, but teach you very little about it so they're best left until you've got yourself some background knowledge.



You absolutely can learn the patterns and make effective use of them without a formal theoretical understanding. You use your ears & make music with them.

its in understanding theory, that you need to understand the scales themselves. Having your fingers and ears on the patterns ahead of time will help, not hinder your progress.

Quote by Chris_09
i just bought a musicians institute guitar soloing book to help expand my learning beyond covering. and i dont quite understand what it is they are asking me to do and i've shown this book to a few people that play some guitar and they are stumpped too. so i hope someone out there can help.. the title of this page is called PLAYING MOVEABLE SCALE PATTERNS
its asking me to play a scale built around the E chord..And to shift the position of the pattern so the circled note(s) in the diagram or over the intended tonic. it shows the pattern on the board and where the root notes are but it ends there pretty much..I have other scale books but I cant seem to find what im looking for..So i guess what im asking is where should i begin on these patterns.. Thanks in advance

Chris


To do what they are asking requires a bit of fret-board knowledge which you may not be ready for. You should know the notes on the fret-board, especially the low 2 strings (E and A). Basically where you start dictates the key/scale. for instance the 6th string 5th fret is an A. Play a Major scale starting on A and your playing an A Major scale. Play it 2 frets higher starting on B... and your playing a B Major scale.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 6, 2008,
#8
he didn't...?

anyway, scale patterns are useful, but i found learning scale construction and the notes of the fretboard to be far, far FAR more useful and beneficial than just learning scale shapes/pattern.

this of course means you can create your own patterns, which can lead to some really, really oddball voicings, but still perfect sounding ones, cos it's all in a scale...
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
You absolutely can learn the patterns and make effective use of them without a formal theoretical understanding. You use your ears & make music with them.

its in understanding theory, that you need to understand the scales themselves. Having your fingers and ears on the patterns ahead of time will help, not hinder your progress.


Exactly.
#11
Quote by Shackman10
Don't learn lame scales just play what sounds good man.

I know my major scales like the back of my hand. Because of this, I can play more interesting and better sounding music than people that just guess.
#12
hello again, i got a good grasp of whats goin on now. i was looking at the dot patterns so hard that i confused myself with the topic.. thanks again everyone for the help