#1
If playing a F Lydian

you could play F lydian starting on the 1st fret low e
G mixolydian on 3rd fret would be the 2nd position
A aeolian on 5th fret could be the 3rd position
B locrian on the 7th fret could be the 4th position
and so on right?
#2
Don't think of modes as positions, think of them in terms of notes.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
Quote by newguitars08
If playing a F Lydian

you could play F lydian starting on the 1st fret low e
G mixolydian on 3rd fret would be the 2nd position
A aeolian on 5th fret could be the 3rd position
B locrian on the 7th fret could be the 4th position
and so on right?


that's right, they all share the same notes
out of here
#4
well sort of, those positions all contain the notes of F Lydian but getting a lydian sound is all dependent on emphasizing the correct notes. With F lydian those notes would mainly be the root, major third, the #4, and the fifth (F, A, B, and C for F lydian) If you already know that then sweet.
Anyway, I think you should avoid saying, for example, that A aeolian is the 3rd position of Lydian because that doesn't really make sense; A aeolian is it's own thing. Obviously that shape contains the notes in F Lydian, which you should know, but calling it a position of Lydian may mislead yourself. You can divide the notes in any major scale, in this case, C, into 7 3nps shapes on the fretboard, one starting on each degree, but that's really as far as it goes. In order to play in Lydian using those shapes you need to be able to figure out which notes in those patterns to emphacize. At first, I would say just try and pay attention to where your F's are. Best thing you could ever do is memorize the fretboard in the key of C...if you already know scale shapes for G mixolydian, B locrian, etc, which it seems like you do, you can use those as a start, since they outline the locations of the notes in C (ABCDEFG). That way you can really figure out how to play in Lydan to its fullest.
#5
Ah, ok...i think i got modes sussed (on paper at least) but playing and using them im finding really confusing. are you saying that for example in the key of Cmajor, to emphasize the sound of whatever mode im in i.e A aolian, i need to concentrate on landing on the notes from the Aminor chord A, E, and C?
#6
Quote by kwikfingers-uk
i need to concentrate on landing on the notes from the Aminor chord A, E, and C?


Well, sort of. Really it's better to think every note has a function based on
it's scale degree. In A minor, A, E and C are the 1, 5 and 3 degrees. The 1 and 5
provide "resting" spots in a neutral sort of way. The 3 is probably the strongest
note of the scale as it is both a rest and defines the scale quality. The 7th is the
other important note for scale quality, but unlike the 3, tends towards motion rather
than rest. The 2, 4, and 6 have qualites in between the others and sort of at the
next level of dissonance. The remaing 5 tones (outside the scale), go to the next
level of dissonance, but still have functions in an altered sense. Additionally,
assuming a chord progression in Am, each different chord has a "colorizing" effect
on any note even though the whole points to Am.
#7
Quote by edg
Well, sort of. Really it's better to think every note has a function based on
it's scale degree. In A minor, A, E and C are the 1, 5 and 3 degrees. The 1 and 5
provide "resting" spots in a neutral sort of way. The 3 is probably the strongest
note of the scale as it is both a rest and defines the scale quality. The 7th is the
other important note for scale quality, but unlike the 3, tends towards motion rather
than rest. The 2, 4, and 6 have qualites in between the others and sort of at the
next level of dissonance. The remaing 5 tones (outside the scale), go to the next
level of dissonance, but still have functions in an altered sense. Additionally,
assuming a chord progression in Am, each different chord has a "colorizing" effect
on any note even though the whole points to Am.


Ahh...brilliant, that's what i was looking for, i knew of 'resting' spots by ear when im playing but never conciously looked at them and figured out what, why and where they were. thanks alot uve been a big help! hopefully this will bring me another small step closer to being able to improvise without worrying so much about where to go next.
#8
Quote by newguitars08
If playing a F Lydian

you could play F lydian starting on the 1st fret low e
G mixolydian on 3rd fret would be the 2nd position
A aeolian on 5th fret could be the 3rd position
B locrian on the 7th fret could be the 4th position
and so on right?
No. Every one of those scales is F Lydian. A mode is defined by its tonality, not position on the neck of the guitar. The theory link in my sig can explain this in greater detail, and I will leave it at that, as I am off to class!
#9
My point was sort of that for a mode such as dorian or lydian, or anything besides major (Ionian) and minor (Aeolian) it can be touchy to get it to sound like youre not playing in major or minor. Like if you say that youre playing in Lydian but keep emphacizing A C and E, well it's really not going to sound Lydian at all. Major and minor dominate the major system and so it is easy to get sucked into either one if you aren't careful when you are trying to play in a mode such as Lydian. You just have to sort of feel it out. Also, when in F Lydian, you can help the F be more dominating in the tonality of your piece by adding the regular 4th, Bb, especially in chordal harmony. Like for example for a 1 4 5 progression in F Lydian, which would on paper be F Major 7, B half dim, C Major 7, you could instead play F Major 7, Bb Major 7, C Major 7 (or C7). This makes it regular F major instead of F lydian and makes it want to resolve to F. There's many things you can do so just start playing around with it.