#1
If a song requires a capo at the 5th fret and it uses a F chord, does the capo act as the barre the same as your index finger would on a first position F chord?
#2
the capo basically where the frets begin.... so like in your case the capo is on the 5th fret, so the 6th fret becomes the 1st fret and the 7th becomes the 2nd and so on. So to answer your question no.
#3
The capo acts as a nut. If the chords are relative to the capo, you still need to barre the first fret in order to make an F chord.
#4
If you hava a capo on the 5th fret, to make an F chord you would finger a C shape. If you barre the first fret after the capo like an F, your making a Bb chord. It depends on what your using your capo for -- to change the key of a song, or to change the voicings of the chords,
#5
Quote by milagroso
If you hava a capo on the 5th fret, to make an F chord you would finger a C shape. If you barre the first fret after the capo like an F, your making a Bb chord. It depends on what your using your capo for -- to change the key of a song, or to change the voicings of the chords,


Exactly. What might make things a bit confusing to some is the custom to name fingersettings after the chords that would sound when playing without capo. Whenever a chord sheet or a partiture prescribes a capo, the chords mentioned above the lyrics or above the bars no longer refer to the actual chords, but to the fingersettings. For instance, fingersetting 3-2-0-0-0-3 is always called a G, but will only really be a G when played without capo. When for instance capo II is prescribed, this G fingersetting will actually ring the chord of A.

You think I'm confusing? Wait till I explain daylight saving time.