#1
This Paint?

http://www.krylon.com/products/indooroutdoor_paint/

My friend is painting his Telecaster build cherry red. We got a primer, 2 colours and 2 clears all of that kind of paint. Is it lacquer, suitable for guitar painting?

None of the stuff we looked at was marked lacquer or enamel or anything. Only duplicolor, and it was $10 a can.
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#2
Yes. I think youll get a light protection if you use that. If you want a thicker clear use polyurethane or nitrocelullose(ive never tried nitrocellulose). But if you are just looking for somthing that will just do the job go for it. My father laquered a guitar with floor laquer and it was fine. Any clear that says thats fine for wood is O.K.
#3
^ Dude I know that. I want to know what kind of paint THAT is. I have used lacquer before, I like it.

I wanna know if that is lacquer though.
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Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#4
Quote by Øttər
This Paint?

http://www.krylon.com/products/indooroutdoor_paint/

My friend is painting his Telecaster build cherry red. We got a primer, 2 colours and 2 clears all of that kind of paint. Is it lacquer, suitable for guitar painting?

None of the stuff we looked at was marked lacquer or enamel or anything. Only duplicolor, and it was $10 a can.

That one's Enamel.

Check out: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=15704829&postcount=535

Also, a pic:



#5
****.

So I can't use it for a guitar? I'll tell my friend.

EDIT: I just read the post you linked me to.

What is the painting/waiting/sanding process for this?
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#6
I've tried enamel paints from home-improvement stores on guitars before, with bad results. In my experience, they tend to give thick finishes per coat, and are actually a pain to apply, especially compared to automotive paints.

I don't really know anything about paints, but I do know that the stuff I've used that's designed for cars gives a smooth, 'dry' coat, whereas the home stuff is usually thick and drippy. Sorry, I can't explain what I mean, and my reply hasn't really been 'helpful'. I just know that I'd avoid those kinds of paints in the future.


Edit: Lawl - least coherent reply EVER.

Edit 2: Having said all of that nonsense: surely it doesn't matter, as long as you sand back a little, and clear coat plenty, then buff? If you've already got the paint, I can't see the harm in using it just for the colour layer, then using a decent clear coat to protect the finish. As for prep and drying times, it should say on the back of the can.
Last edited by -MintSauce- at Sep 6, 2008,
#7
We're just going with some tried and true lacquer. We will return it tomorrow.

The automotive paint is $10 a can

As ippon posted in the link, we will get some "old" krylon.
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Quote by Scowmoo
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#8
Quote by Øttər
We're just going with some tried and true lacquer. We will return it tomorrow.

The automotive paint is $10 a can

As ippon posted in the link, we will get some "old" krylon.

The automotive paint that -MintSauce- referred to is Duplicolor (in the US) and it's also Acrylic Lacquer, like Krylon, and both are manufactured by Sherwin-Williams.

I used Krylon and Duplicolor for the Crash/Petrucci mod ... it took 1.5 days.