#1
Hey guys i don't know whether this has been asked b4 but i need to know, what exactly does a piezo pickup do on a bass? I'm buying a new bass and can't decide whether o get the piezo or non piezo version. only difference is the piezo and the paint jobs. everything else is exactly the same.
prices are:
piezo=900
non-piezo=700

is it worth it? will the piezo add enough tonal versatility to make it worth 200 dollars or should i just get the regular one? for the record i'm very into Metallica, Muse, Wooten, Sting, and tons of others so i need versatility. My main tone though is going to end up being distorted and flanged and kinda heavy. The basses are Ibanez btb570fm and btb780pb. I know some people do not like the btb series or ibanez in general but i've tried the version without the piezo and decided i like it so only advice on piezo or not. Thanks guys!
Quote by blacksabbath8
So I had to take a massive dump, and I went in the bassment. So it's been down there for a while and the stench is terrible and i think it's seeping into the floor.


#3
i just have to questions, if you dont mind/

what are piezo pickups?

and if i got a bass with one could i turn it off or something?
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#5
cheers

il have a look
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#6
in reply to sonsie:

What are piezo pickups?
Piezoelectric pickups are best known as the undersaddle pickups used to amplify acoustic guitars. Sensing mostly the vibrations coming directly from the strings themselves, they give a relatively pure acoustic tone. While the lack of of the acoustic's body resonance and tone make the piezo sound a little sterile in comparison to a mic'ed acoustic guitar, the excellent resistance to feedback makes them ideal for live amplification.
Unlike the magnetic pickups used for electric guitars, piezos are very good at sensing higher frequency sounds, making them ideal for acoustic guitar applications, which have a higher proportion of the upper frequency sound than their electric counterparts. As they work with pressure rather than magnetism, they are also well suited to non-magnetic strings, such as bronze or even nylon.

How do they work?
Piezo pickups are formed from a crystal or ceramic material, which produces electricity when stressed. In our application, the stressing comes from string vibration. The piezo element senses the small changes in pressure as the string vibrates, and produces alternating current.

In an electric guitar piezo saddle, the piezoelectric element is embedded in the saddle itself, rather than under it as with most acoustic pickups. Due to piezo crystals and ceramics being brittle, the string itself cannot rest directly on the element, so manufacturers either fit the element between a piece of metal and the rest of the saddle, or in the case of the Graph Tech GHOST saddles, embed the element in the material of the saddle itself.

sorry i had to cut and paste that bcuz i'm kinda lazy today. also you can shut it off or you can use it alone or you can blend it with your other pickups to give you more versatility. they kinda give a very acoustic sound on electric guitar. not sure about bass though.
Quote by blacksabbath8
So I had to take a massive dump, and I went in the bassment. So it's been down there for a while and the stench is terrible and i think it's seeping into the floor.


#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Piezo pickups tend to be a lot more sensitive than magnetic pickups, and are normally inserted under or into the bridge. I like them, but I also know a few who don't. It really is a case of trying one out. They're quite marmite, if you get me.

I'm sorry but what does marmite mean? sounds like and awesome word but i'm not quite sure of the meaning lol. also would it make the 200 dollar difference easier to swallow? thanks
Quote by blacksabbath8
So I had to take a massive dump, and I went in the bassment. So it's been down there for a while and the stench is terrible and i think it's seeping into the floor.


#8
Quote by the elshal
I'm sorry but what does marmite mean? sounds like and awesome word but i'm not quite sure of the meaning lol. also would it make the 200 dollar difference easier to swallow? thanks


Marmite is another way of saying something people either love, or completely hate.
#9
Quote by the elshal
in reply to sonsie:

What are piezo pickups?
Piezoelectric pickups are best known as the undersaddle pickups used to amplify acoustic guitars. Sensing mostly the vibrations coming directly from the strings themselves, they give a relatively pure acoustic tone. While the lack of of the acoustic's body resonance and tone make the piezo sound a little sterile in comparison to a mic'ed acoustic guitar, the excellent resistance to feedback makes them ideal for live amplification.
Unlike the magnetic pickups used for electric guitars, piezos are very good at sensing higher frequency sounds, making them ideal for acoustic guitar applications, which have a higher proportion of the upper frequency sound than their electric counterparts. As they work with pressure rather than magnetism, they are also well suited to non-magnetic strings, such as bronze or even nylon.

How do they work?
Piezo pickups are formed from a crystal or ceramic material, which produces electricity when stressed. In our application, the stressing comes from string vibration. The piezo element senses the small changes in pressure as the string vibrates, and produces alternating current.

In an electric guitar piezo saddle, the piezoelectric element is embedded in the saddle itself, rather than under it as with most acoustic pickups. Due to piezo crystals and ceramics being brittle, the string itself cannot rest directly on the element, so manufacturers either fit the element between a piece of metal and the rest of the saddle, or in the case of the Graph Tech GHOST saddles, embed the element in the material of the saddle itself.

sorry i had to cut and paste that bcuz i'm kinda lazy today. also you can shut it off or you can use it alone or you can blend it with your other pickups to give you more versatility. they kinda give a very acoustic sound on electric guitar. not sure about bass though.


thanks for that and all

but im still dont understand completely (i read it all)

like wat sort of tone does it give you?
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#10
Quote by sonsie
thanks for that and all

but im still dont understand completely (i read it all)

like wat sort of tone does it give you?

Try it out yourself.

If you don't know what it is and can't hear a difference then don't waste $200 for it.
I'll lay waiting, just waiting for my time to come
#11
uhhh im not buying one, jst asking about it


lol
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

Quote by MetalBass 77
sonsie knows all
#12
Quote by sonsie
uhhh im not buying one, jst asking about it


lol


Depending on where it's positioned, it can give you a woody, growly sound, or an acoustic sound, or a whole range of tones.
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