Page 1 of 2
#1
Alright, I've recently just turned 21, and it made me do some thinking.

A lot of people I know started guitar anywhere from 13-16 or so, and have been playing ever since. And out of those players, a good amount of them have put in enough practice to really know how to play very well.

And then there are those who not only started young, but managed to become extremely successful by a young age. For instance, regardless of whether or not you like the band, Matt Heafy of Trivium is only 22.

Now, does anyone think that it's possible to just start too late. I don't even like saying how long I've played guitar, because regardless of when I started, I always wish I had started even younger. I absolutely love music and want to do this for the rest of my life. Obviously, becoming very successful would be pretty nice too. But sometimes, I really worry.

Not to mention the fact that most bands I see are made up of friends who have known each other for years. And I don't know about anyone else, but I've moved around quite a bit my entire life, and am even going to be moving to yet another city for my last two years of college. It makes it really hard to find someone who can be not only a great musician to work with but someone who you've been longtime friends with.
#3
Never too late. It's how much you put into it that counts, not how many years you've been playing.
#4
I believe Glen Tipton learned in his 20's so there's hope for you.
Questions of science
Science and progress
Do not speak as loud as my heart
#6
Too late, you're ****ed.
I've had Alzheimer's Disease for as long as I can remember.

Quote by damian_91
Pleasure2kill, you are a genius!
#9
What does age have to do with it? It's just fun, right?

Quote by FireandFlames
Never too late. You can start any time, whether you're seven or seventy

If you start 1 second after you're 70, you'll implode and create a black hole, and destroy the world.
Plays:
Schecter Hellraiser Solo-6 FR Limited
Parker Mojo Fly
Ibanez SZR 720
Tanglewood Evolution
LaPatrie Etude DEMO
'66 Hagstrom Viking I (customized)
SGR C-7 (defretted)
Agile Intrepid 828

Amp, Pedals:
Laney LV300
BOSS RC-20XL
Last edited by Fryer Mike at Sep 7, 2008,
#10
No, it doesn't matter. Look at the jonas brothers. They pwn eddie van halen and he's been playing for a long time

Anyways, no. As long as you have the motivation and will to learn, you could be 60 and start guitar.
#11
Thanks, I mean, I've been playing for a while now...

but then when I see how far ahead some people were by my age (or younger) it really gets to me.

I'm always pushing myself to be a better player, constantly. But I'm never satisfied, I'm never good enough. So I keep practicing even harder, and it still doesn't feel like enough.
#12
Tom Morrello started at uni. Mind you, he was taught by MAB and put in 8 hours a day, almost religiously, but that's just a technicality.
Quote by metal4all
Just, no. Locrian should be treated like that gay cousin. Just avoid him cuz he's weird, unstable, and is attracted to the wrong thing.


Quote by steven seagull
Big deal, I bought a hamster once and they put that in a box...doesn't make it a scale.
#13
The singer/songwriter for Boston started learning guitar at twenty-one. He recorded every part for every song on the self-titled album (Boston) a year later.
#14
better late than never.
v CLICK v



Quote by musicjunkie207
The time I fell on my face on a trampoline and cracked my neck, then proceded to run around the yard in a blind panic screaming "I hope I'm not paralyzed! OH GOD I THINK I'M PARALYZED!"
#15
Yeah, there are a couple of blues bands around here where the musicians are in their late 40s and 50 and started playing the guitar in their 30s or so.

Never too late.
#16
Wes Montgomery


Next in line please.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#17
Never too late. I wish I would have started a couple years earlier then I did though.
I started when I was 12.
Removed because of damn rules.. >_>
#18
It's a societal myth, everyone trying to be younger than they actually are. Forty is the new twenty and all that shit, so that now if you haven't gotten a record deal in the music business by the time you're 20, you won't be succesful in music at all. But I can tell you it's bullshit and you should be comfortable with when you started playing guitar. No one should feel they're too old to start playing music.
#19
Glenn Tipton of Judas Priest started playing when he was 21, and he is in one of the most successful bands in metal all time
Gear:
Gibson Flying V
Jackson RR3 w/ Zakk Wylde EMG's
'89 Marshall 8240 Combo Amp
Marshall MG10 CD
Boss MT-2
Dunlop Dime Crybaby From Hell
#20
Nah, its not to late. Three or four years of practicing right, and practicing hard, you should be up there with the people that have played since there teens. I say this because a lot of people don't practice as much when they hit a certain skill level. Which will make them progress more slowly, not progress at all, or maybe even regress.

Yes, it is probably to late to become the next great guitarist. But its never to late to make music.
#21
I started when I was 12 and I'm 15 this month

I wish I started younger but you can never change the past but you can change the future so stop kicking yourself over the past and focus on what you are doing now
Quote by Bartleby
i tune to drop-Z and string my guitar with barbed wire.

Quote by UncleCthulhu
we r all rlaeted bcuz teh bibel sez so we r al innbreads lolo


Prime Minister of Puppets of The Australia FTW Club

One of The 9 Winners of the Official 5th MOD Contest
#22
Quote by abstract pie
Nah, its not to late. Three or four years of practicing right, and practicing hard, you should be up there with the people that have played since there teens. I say this because a lot of people don't practice as much when they hit a certain skill level. Which will make them progress more slowly, not progress at all, or maybe even regress.

Yes, it is probably to late to become the next great guitarist. But its never to late to make music.


I would agree that a lot of people stop really working at improving after a certain point,

but I'd like to not believe that it's too late to be "the next great guitarist" so to speak. Not if I (or anyone) work hard enough.
#23
Quote by Delanoir
I would agree that a lot of people stop really working at improving after a certain point,

but I'd like to not believe that it's too late to be "the next great guitarist" so to speak. Not if I (or anyone) work hard enough.


That would be why I put the word probably in there. There's certainly a disadvantage to starting late. But with motivation, practicing right, and a little natural skill, there is no boundaries.
#25
it sounds like you are intending to be a rock star. in that case, yes, i would say you might be too late. unless you have some natural tallent that can get you going fast, you would probably be too old to be popular by the time you can play well. besides, being a rock star is an extreme longshot. 99.9% of guitarists arent, and the competition is pretty fierce for the main spots. most of us will never be rock stars.

but, if you just want to learn a new instrument to entertain yourself and maybe play with a few friends, you arent late by any means. do it if it makes you happy. i just approach guitar as a hobby anyway. trying to be a rockstar is putting all your eggs in one rediculously unstable basket. there are failed rock stars in crack houses and dive bars everywhere.

but learn guitar, and have fun with it.
.
..
...
I have no opinion on this matter.
#26
My ex-girlfriend's Dad started when he was in his mid-40's. So it's not too late to start.

I always think the same thing about writing a novel. Being in my mid-20's I keep thinking that if I don't write a book soon it's going to be too late
Official member of the "UG Senior Citizens Club For People Over 21"
********
Official member of the "UG Fat Chicks Appreciation Club" (Yeah, no one will probably follow...)

#27
I think you're too worried about failing to make it. Age has nothing to do with it and sometimes the length of time you've been playing doesnt matter either. Its all about heart and spirit and how much you love playing guitar. If you pick up a guitar and are thinking about how cool Chris Brown's dancing is then your ****ed.... but if you pick it up and say, man i really want to be the best guitarist in the world and i want everyone to know it then you really are heading towards success...
Makin love, makin love for two, makin love for two minutes... When its with me you only need two minutes... cuz I’m intense

Proud owner of the Anti Gnome Extermination Confederation.

Give me a yell if you wanna join!!!
#28
Quote by Zugunruhe
it sounds like you are intending to be a rock star. in that case, yes, i would say you might be too late. unless you have some natural tallent that can get you going fast, you would probably be too old to be popular by the time you can play well. besides, being a rock star is an extreme longshot. 99.9% of guitarists arent, and the competition is pretty fierce for the main spots. most of us will never be rock stars.

but, if you just want to learn a new instrument to entertain yourself and maybe play with a few friends, you arent late by any means. do it if it makes you happy. i just approach guitar as a hobby anyway. trying to be a rockstar is putting all your eggs in one rediculously unstable basket. there are failed rock stars in crack houses and dive bars everywhere.

but learn guitar, and have fun with it.


It's not that I want to be a "rock star" or some ridiculously famous/rich/etc. musician, as amazing as that would be.

But music is the only thing I want to do, and can imagine being happy doing. I love it, completely. Nothing else comes anywhere close.

Honestly, call me naive if you want, but as far as real success goes... and this applies to any profession really... I think it's all about how hard you work at it. Yes, I'm sure there are lucky breaks, and it's sure as hell not easy, but I would say that the people you hear about are those who (more often than not) got there by really giving their all. Rather than getting jaded and just thinking it's purely luck of the draw and something you either just have or don't.
#29
Quote by Delanoir
It's not that I want to be a "rock star" or some ridiculously famous/rich/etc. musician, as amazing as that would be.

But music is the only thing I want to do, and can imagine being happy doing. I love it, completely. Nothing else comes anywhere close.

Honestly, call me naive if you want, but as far as real success goes... and this applies to any profession really... I think it's all about how hard you work at it. Yes, I'm sure there are lucky breaks, and it's sure as hell not easy, but I would say that the people you hear about are those who (more often than not) got there by really giving their all. Rather than getting jaded and just thinking it's purely luck of the draw and something you either just have or don't.
do you have any musical training? how do you know you would love it? the reality could be completely different from the romantic ideas of it that you have.

i agree that it takes hard work. just think, some of us have been putting hard work into it since we were ten. dedication isnt rewarded so much as results. if you intend to compete actually with the bulk of musicians, you better believe you have something going for you. do you write songs/poetry? do you play any instruments? are you very very good with people? i think the last is the most important. if you are the type that is a complete people person, i think that is something that really helps musicians.

and if you actually want to do it, you have to catch up. play guitar for eight hours a day, study music theory, listen to all the music that you can. you better believe other people are doing these things. clapton practiced constantly, and it payed off for him. all the greats worked really really hard at it, an you have to too if you want to compete.

the problem with this kind of dedication is that it is reckless. plenty of people that are dedicated dont make it, and theyre S.O.L. then youre stuck with no backup plan and no source of income at thirty. do you have a degree or a well paying day job to fall back on? you will probably be happier with money than without.

anyway, do what you want, dont pay any attention to me.
.
..
...
I have no opinion on this matter.
#30
Quote by Zugunruhe
do you have any musical training? how do you know you would love it? the reality could be completely different from the romantic ideas of it that you have.

i agree that it takes hard work. just think, some of us have been putting hard work into it since we were ten. dedication isnt rewarded so much as results. if you intend to compete actually with the bulk of musicians, you better believe you have something going for you. do you write songs/poetry? do you play any instruments? are you very very good with people? i think the last is the most important. if you are the type that is a complete people person, i think that is something that really helps musicians.

and if you actually want to do it, you have to catch up. play guitar for eight hours a day, study music theory, listen to all the music that you can. you better believe other people are doing these things. clapton practiced constantly, and it payed off for him. all the greats worked really really hard at it, an you have to too if you want to compete.

the problem with this kind of dedication is that it is reckless. plenty of people that are dedicated dont make it, and theyre S.O.L. then youre stuck with no backup plan and no source of income at thirty. do you have a degree or a well paying day job to fall back on? you will probably be happier with money than without.

anyway, do what you want, dont pay any attention to me.


Well, while I did pick up the guitar a bit later, I have been doing music almost my entire life.

And yes, I do write songs. I have quite a few, actually. I'm also quite a people person.

But I do see what you're saying. Nothing is going to change my mind, though, I realize. This is what I love, and want to do until the day die. I don't care about the odds, because I'll just keep working harder and harder, like I always do.
#31
just make music on your own terms, that way it doesn't matter how old you are.
the blues man t model ford got his first guitar at around 60 so age is no excuse.
#32
Quote by Delanoir
Well, while I did pick up the guitar a bit later, I have been doing music almost my entire life.

And yes, I do write songs. I have quite a few, actually. I'm also quite a people person.

But I do see what you're saying. Nothing is going to change my mind, though, I realize. This is what I love, and want to do until the day die. I don't care about the odds, because I'll just keep working harder and harder, like I always do.


If this is what you really wanna do then just do it. Maybe find another okay paying job, get enough to live by yourself and work with your music. By then you'd already be happier than a lot of white collar working people. Maybe with a bit of luck you can eventually make more money by playing guitar and itll just get better from there.

As for being always one step behind, there's always going to be someone better than you. Even the best guitarists have a limit, its just that they dont show it. If you get frustrated, thing of something you do a lot better than others on the guitar or maybe look at some nubs playing on youtube. I've gave your stuff a listen and you're not bad at all. If you get some good recording i can see you going far.
Jackson DXMG -> Vai Morley Wah -> Korg Black Tuner -> (Need a delay) -> Maxon OD808 -> BBE Sonic Maximizer -> ISP Noisegate -> Mesa Boogie Mark IV
#33
well its not to late to jam and stuff but if you want to be really good and succesful you should of started earlyer.
Quote by Stress Cow
You know you're fucked up when the pit thinks you're a sick bastard.
#34
My teacher (no not guitar teacher) started at 50-60 (I dunno how old he is) and he is 60 or something now and he is still learning


so never too late
Quote by Carmel
You are a redeeming feature for the UG Swedish population.


All-riiight.
#35
Never too late, man! I'm only 22, and my band's only been around for just over a year, and we've already opened for Prong.
It's not the amount of time it takes, it's the quality of practice and how much you put into it.
Now get off the internet and get on that f*ckin' guitar!
Thorns Of Creation
Melodic Death Metal from Oregon
Check us out.


Quote by GibsonPuppeteer
I've had tiny ones in my mouth and accidentally swallowed a bit of the liquid, you should be all right.
#36
Go solo, man.

No wankers to push you around, no musical disagreements, no substandard musicians dragging you down, and the glory is all yours.

ALL YOURS!

ALL YOURS!

*manic laughter*
VENUSIAN
FB SC BC TW
Patterns In The Ivy present ethnicity on an intriguing and dedicated level. ~Ambient Exotica
A mesmeric melange of yearning voice, delicate piano and carefully chosen samples. ~Lost Voices
#37
"it's not too late, it's never too late....."
what Three Days Grace said.
Your dreams are all out of focus;
Knock you up when you're feeling down.
And all the world feels so unreal...


COLORFUL COLORS
Quote by ishmonkey
Hitler was really smart and could have been a good leader but he was kind of a douche to the Jews.
#39
Quote by Zugunruhe
it sounds like you are intending to be a rock star. in that case, yes, i would say you might be too late. unless you have some natural tallent that can get you going fast, you would probably be too old to be popular by the time you can play well. besides, being a rock star is an extreme longshot. 99.9% of guitarists arent, and the competition is pretty fierce for the main spots. most of us will never be rock stars.

but, if you just want to learn a new instrument to entertain yourself and maybe play with a few friends, you arent late by any means. do it if it makes you happy. i just approach guitar as a hobby anyway. trying to be a rockstar is putting all your eggs in one rediculously unstable basket. there are failed rock stars in crack houses and dive bars everywhere.

but learn guitar, and have fun with it.



All I have to say is...H.I.M., Godsmack, SlipKnoT, AC/DC, The Rolling Stones, Metallica...Shall I continue? It's not too late for him to make music for the rest of his life.


Hey man, I'll be in a similar situation, when I am able to finally start working on my dream, I'll be 22. With that said, I'll be happy if I can make a living off of it around 25 or so because I don't want to do it young. It's better when you have matured and really found the sound you want. Most of these young bands, if you listen, they change their sound after about 2 or 3 albums. IMO, it's because they started too early and didn't work on developing the sound they really wanted, just a sound that would make them money.
"Ignorance runs rampant through this virus we call life, dead one day, alive the next, never breaking a stride. As I take it all in and realize, nothing we do can stop it, I release the hatred from my eyes, only to feel it within."
Page 1 of 2