#1
about fretwire:
- does the size affect the sound?
- is there any avantage/disadvantage playing with larger frets?

about re-fretting a les paul
- why is that so expensive? (somebody say it costs around US $300 )
- is there any difficulties/risk?

I'm asking all these questions 'coz I read somewhere that larger frets help improving the speed and vibrato.is that true?
Last edited by Duncan_amateur at Sep 7, 2008,
#3
Size does matter.

Not really though, i just said that cause it's like im talking about a penis.

Neways, people claim that they are faster when the frets are wider. I dont understand this, because the top of the fret is the top of the fret, whether the fret is jumbo or not, the crowns will always lye in the same position (at the precise point where it makes the note).

If you have a binding, a re-fret job will be more expensive than a guitar without one. $300 is pretty steep though; i was gonna guess $200 at most.

The only advantage from frets, as I see it, is that the wider ones will last longer and the taller ones won't allow the strings to buzz out during bends in the higher region of the guitar; that is if your guitar doesn't have a multi-radiused neck.
#4
Larger frets will help with bending or if you use higher gauge strings. Usually it's preference. Play a Jackson or Ibanez, then play a Gibson. Usually, the old Gibsons have low frets, and most Jacksons have near bass frets.

Also, there are stainless steel frets. It will reduce wear on your frets, but it might make your tone brighter.

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#5
Quote by dogismycopilot
Size does matter.

Not really though, i just said that cause it's like im talking about a penis.


Neways, people claim that they are faster when the frets are wider. I dont understand this, because the top of the fret is the top of the fret, whether the fret is jumbo or not, the crowns will always lye in the same position (at the precise point where it makes the note).

If you have a binding, a re-fret job will be more expensive than a guitar without one. $300 is pretty steep though; i was gonna guess $200 at most.

The only advantage from frets, as I see it, is that the wider ones will last longer and the taller ones won't allow the strings to buzz out during bends in the higher region of the guitar; that is if your guitar doesn't have a multi-radiused neck.

Sig'd. lmfao.

Listen to this guy. He knows what he's talking about.
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#6
Dog, if size doesnt matter you obviously have a small wee wee

although I disagree about taller frets not fretting out during bends, as a tight radius is what causes strings to fret out, and taller frets will all still follow the same radius, so they will still fret out.

and wider & tall frets are suppose to be a bit like playing on a scalloped fingerboard and so requiring less effort to fret the note, but I'm not sure how much difference it makes.

Fret size probably doesnt make much difference to sound.

and fretting/refretting with binding requires more work and so more expensive (tangs have to be nipped, binding has to be cleaned up around the fret end etc).


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#7
The cost of a regular fret job is usually about 10 bucks a fret so close to 200. And the binding does add alot of work to a fret job so increases the cost. Its pretty east to damage the binding so takes some effort not to damage it. Fret size is pretty much a preference thing. Stainless frets are nice they will last a long time, but does cost more to get done as its harder to work with. Many shops wont even deal with stainless and even fewer will do it on a bound fretboard.
#8
i have extra jumbo frets on my hellraiser and it makes a significant difference in terms of bends and general technique. There is more room for error because the string can change pitch depending how much you press the string. I much prefer medium frets because legato etc is much easier.
#9
Quote by Absent Mind
Dog, if size doesnt matter you obviously have a small wee wee

although I disagree about taller frets not fretting out during bends, as a tight radius is what causes strings to fret out, and taller frets will all still follow the same radius, so they will still fret out.

and wider & tall frets are suppose to be a bit like playing on a scalloped fingerboard and so requiring less effort to fret the note, but I'm not sure how much difference it makes.

Fret size probably doesnt make much difference to sound.

and fretting/refretting with binding requires more work and so more expensive (tangs have to be nipped, binding has to be cleaned up around the fret end etc).

Ah yes, didn't think about it like that. The radius being the same no matter what fret you use. But players that shred prefer the "scalloped" feel of the larger frets because its supposed to help with something. Its a buncha hogwash, but thats just me.

P.S. It gets the job done. On a good day they are satisfied.
#10
^Yeah, for shredders, it helps because they have usually have a light touch. They only have to touch the string lightly before it makes the correct note, since the frets are taller. Less pressure = more speed.

However, changing frets isn't a really shortcut to sounding better, which is what the threadstarter seems to be looking for.