#1
so my guitar teacher showed me a pattern in my lesson the other day where you can connect about five different scales and still be in one key. For example, if you're in the key of A, he said you can play G major, A dorian, D mixolydian, and E minor. I know this works already, because I've used it sucessfully in a band setting several times. I was just wondering if there was any way to get the other modes involved? Like is there another position to play Locrian, Phrygian, and Lydian out of?
Up the Punx!
#2
Well, you'd only be playing specific scales if the harmony suggests it, and I don't see how you could ever play G major or E minor when the key is A major, because there are two notes in A that the aforementioned scales don't have. Since D Mixolydian is a mode of G major, I wouldn't really see how you'd play that over A major harmony as well.

Finally, Dorian is a minor mode, so if your harmony suggests A major, I still fail to see how you could be playing A Dorian. You should learn that the key aspect of modes is the tonal center; you're not playing a specific mode unless it's suggested by the harmony. What makes modes unique is their specific intervals, which are only brought about by having the correct harmonic context. If you want to play Locrian, Phrygian or Lydian, simply find a good chordal vamp for any of them.
#3
At which point I'm now awaiting the legendary Archeo comment....
Last edited by mdc at Sep 7, 2008,
#4
I have seen in the past people have been taught the different major scale positions as different modes of the major scale. So when learning the CAGED system for example they might learn the following shape:
E|--5---7-8-
B|--5-6---8-
G|4-5---7---
D|--5---7----
A|--5---7-8-
E|--5---7-8-

As A Aeolian or A minor. Is this what has happened here? This shape is simply the 3rd Form of the C Major Scale.

Any shape of the C major scale also doubles as a shape for any of the following modes:
D Dorian E Phrygian F Lydian G Mixolydian A Aeolian and B Locrian. Since all these modes contain the same seven notes. EDIT: which mode you are playing in is determined by where the music resolves. If it resolves to C it is C Major if it resolves to A it's A minor if it resolves to G it's G mixolydian.

As for your post if you were playing in the key of A major and played A Dorian against it it would sound a bit funny. If that A was meant to be a G it would make more sense.

If you were playing in the key of G and played any of the following modes:
A Dorian; B Phrygian; C Lydian; D Mixolydian; E Aeolian (aka E minor); and/or F# Lydian
then you are playing the same notes as the G major scale.

Modes as :-D has said have different interval structures than the major scale. It seems to me you are just using different positions of the major scale over the fretboard to play the same scale and calling them modes.

If you want some more on modes here's something that might be useful - though it is quite a wall of text - even for me. previous post on Modes

Quote by :-D
You should learn that the key aspect of modes is the tonal center; you're not playing a specific mode unless it's suggested by the harmony. What makes modes unique is their specific intervals, which are only brought about by having the correct harmonic context. If you want to play Locrian, Phrygian or Lydian, simply find a good chordal vamp for any of them.
Tonal centre or final is the key aspect of modes. Though harmony will determine a tonal centre, modes can be established without harmonic context (i.e. through melody alone).

The easiest way to use modes harmonically is through a suitable chordal vamp. However, when used with care modes can be used to create more complex chord progressions also.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 8, 2008,
#5
in that key, you could've played:

G major, A dorian, B phrygian, C Lydian, D Mixolydian, E minor, or B locrian
My sig used to be so awesome it got me banned
#6
Quote by mdc
At which point I'm now awaiting the legendary Archeo comment....


Should I put it in my sig? I'm really considering it.

G major, A dorian, B phrygian, C Lydian, D Mixolydian, E minor, or B locrian


Relative modes share the same key signature, but saying that they're in the same key is misleading (bordering on wrong). The notes CDEFGAB over a C major progression are C major. Not A minor. Not D dorian. They are C major. You are not switching modes just because you've switched positions.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 7, 2008,