#3
To give personal opinion.
Mahogany gives a very warm sound, and in the cases I've witnessed is usually of a good sound (providing it's paired with a good amp).
Basswood is very middle of the road, it works well with effects and EQing and other stuff like that, however if you get a low grade of it, you can tell.
#4
Mahogany is the sound you love listening to.
Every LP, SG, flying V, is made of it.
You like AC/DC, get mahogany.

Basswood is the soft, pine-related crap squier bullets are made of, that ibanez hails as a tonewood.
If you like my chemical romance, get basswood.
...
Please do not insinuate anything sexual from that.

Quote by cobain_is_king
If your friends don't like your guitar, cover it in stickers and it'll be teh rawks!
#5
Well basswood does sound good, its just so soft.
Mahogany sounds slightly different, isn't soft but is much heavier.
It is also starting to get expensive to use nowadays.

I wouldn't mind either but you're only really going to notice the difference when the guitar isn't plugged in. I would say mahogany has a deeper and warmer tone.
Try out an RG (basswood) and an S (mahogany) series Ibanez if you want to hear/feel the difference.
#6
Basswood is the soft, pine-related crap squier bullets are made of

Tell that to Satriani!

"Sound-wise, Basswood has a nice, growley, warm tone with good mids. A favorite tone wood for shredders in the 80s since its defined sound cuts through a mix well."

http://www.jemsite.com/jem/wood.htm
" Its very suitable for the typical guitar range, and very suitable for lead guitar, because of its pronounced “out front” sound. Complex overtones are muted along with the highs leaving a strong fundamental tone."

So really it depends what you want the guitar for.
#7
Well, in my experience, basswood is fairly similar to mahogany in weight and tone, and is often used as a cheaper substitute for mahogany. I have two Les Pauls which are made of mahogany, and a Strat copy made of basswood. Now, they're very different guitars, so it's difficult to compare completely. What I will say, is that my Strat is much heavier, sustains a touch more, and has a warmer tone than Strats made of alder (the wood Fender use for 'real' Strats). It isn't as warm, heavy, and doesn't sustain as long as my Les Pauls, but then it wouldn't. The Les Pauls have a huge mass advantage, and also have higher-output pickups.

Quote by Iansmitchell
Basswood is the soft, pine-related crap squier bullets are made of, that ibanez hails as a tonewood.
If you like my chemical romance, get basswood.


I don't know why people go around regurgitating this bollocks. Isn't Joe Satriani's £1,100 Ibanez signature made of basswood? You can also get dirt cheap guitars made out of mahogany, you know. The only specs I can get on Squire Bullets is that they're made of "Laminated Hardwood" or "Solid Hardwood". "Hardwood" is a generic umbrella term which covers all of species of hardwood, including mahogany, etc. Which most likely means they're made of something like plywood, not basswood. It would say if it was basswood. You really need to stop going around like you're some authority on tone woods. You don't know anything.