#1
Ive been playing guitar for approximately 7 months now. I sat my self down and only practiced theory and beginner books stuff from my lessons and wanted to master that stuff before actually playing rock covers and stuff. After a while (aka a month ago) I decided to actually play the covers regardless of my progress.

Most of the music has just been chugging power chords. Which for the most part is fine except that it doesn't sound too clean when I play a power vhord with a root on the 5th string. It sounds terrible with distortion most likely because I am hitting the sixth string.

Ive been told I have several ways to deal with this.

A) Mute the sixth string with my index finger (finger holding down the root) by barely touching the sixth string from under.

B) Mute the sixth string with my middle finger (which isn't being used)

C) Just not hitting the sixth string ( seems the least likely choice seeing as you often wont have enough time to be that precise)

What do you do/what do most guitarists do?

Any possible advice on the topic would be appreciated. Please no flames, i know it seems like a dumb question.
Last edited by XeRoXyoS at Sep 7, 2008,
#3
Use the sixth string.

Instead of this:
x577xx

play this:
5577xx

Option A is a very good choice though. Its what I do and I felt like it required little practice.
Gear:
Gibson Faded Flying V

Marshall MG100HDFX
Marshall MA50C

Boss DS-1
Digitech RP50
Digitech Whammy IV
Vox V847 Wah Pedal
#6
Trust me, the first way works the best. I had the same problem, but after about a week or so of practicing power chords with my 1st finger barley touching the E string, it got to be muscle memory and now I always do them this way. Still, experiment and practice and you'll find what works best for you.
#7
I'd go with C, but when playing them with 5th string roots I tend to palm mute the 6th string anyways to avoid accidentally scraping it if I strum hard. Practice the Godzilla riff by Blue Oyster Cult.
#9
i use my thumb. they say not to wrap your thumb around, but it works really well
My Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Standard (Ebony)
Ibanez RR250
Squire Strat

Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Line 6 Spider III 15

Boss DD-20
Boss OS-2
Boss BD-2
Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#10
Half of you gave pretty bad advice :-\. Palm muting isn't a solution, you just hit the sixth string muted, plus most songs aren't palm muted and if they are they go between muted and non-muted. And playing the sixth string a 4th below results in a 2nd inversion power, which is completely different than a root power.
Using your thumb works if you have long enough fingers, but is a horrible habit to start, once you get better at guitar it'll hurt you for sure and you'll just have to change it.
Playing precise enough to skip the 6th string isn't the answer either, once you start playing full bar chords and jazz chords you have to have muted notes, so you may aswell get used to it.

The proper way of playing a power chord with a root on your A-string is to mute the E-string with your middle finger. You do want to try to be precise, but when you're strumming along it shouldn't be your primary concern because when doing alternate strums it's practically unavoidable.
Schecter Fan Club!

My gear:

Schecter Hellraiser Avenger
Epiphone Les paul Slash Signature
Ovation 2778LX
Boss DD-20
Dimebag Crybaby from Hell
Kustom Quad 100DFX
Vox AD100VT-XL
#11
^ I don't do that, I mute the 6th string with my first finger and it works fine.
#12
Quote by Rave765
^ I don't do that, I mute the 6th string with my first finger and it works fine.


That works fine to, the only issue with that is that you're kinda training your index finger to be less percise because you need the overhang to mute the sixth, also if you're up strumming you might get a bit of vibration on the 6th string which doesn't sound good.
Schecter Fan Club!

My gear:

Schecter Hellraiser Avenger
Epiphone Les paul Slash Signature
Ovation 2778LX
Boss DD-20
Dimebag Crybaby from Hell
Kustom Quad 100DFX
Vox AD100VT-XL
#14
Just keep practicing at it and after a while you won't even hit the 6th string. Keep working on precision, just muting it wont help you with that.
#15
I don't hit the 6th string, so that's your option c). When playing a power chord ideally you don't want to hit strings which aren't fretted.

Practice = perfect :P
#16
Quote by Ze_Metal
I don't mute and I'm doing fine. You can be precise, it just takes practice.

What he said.
#17
Quote by Shard Heilia
I wrap my thumb around and mute, you could try that.


+1
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#18
Quote by XeRoXyoS
so basically its torn between option a and b


No definitely not! Option C. A and B are teaching yourself bad habits. Go the right way.
#19
Quote by BGSM
No definitely not! Option C. A and B are teaching yourself bad habits. Go the right way.


Not really, when doing down up strumming it's fine to hit the mutes, obviously when you're just down strumming you really shouldn't hit your low E. Precision is important but when you're playing, for example, a jazz style minor-7 you have to hit a mute string, it's impossible to strum it without hitting a mute.
Schecter Fan Club!

My gear:

Schecter Hellraiser Avenger
Epiphone Les paul Slash Signature
Ovation 2778LX
Boss DD-20
Dimebag Crybaby from Hell
Kustom Quad 100DFX
Vox AD100VT-XL
#20
There are exceptions, but when playing a simple 1-5 or 1-5-1 power chord with the root on the A string, it's better to learn the habit of precision rather than the habit that gives you the easy way out.
#21
Quote by BGSM
There are exceptions, but when playing a simple 1-5 or 1-5-1 power chord with the root on the A string, it's better to learn the habit of precision rather than the habit that gives you the easy way out.

+1

It takes time to develop accuracy at speed, the worst thing you can do is try to shortcut your way around learning basic, fundamental techniques. Think about it, if you were playing a lead part you wouldn't be hitting the strings you didn't want to play (unless you were deliberately going for that muted, funky vibe like Hendrix or Frusciante), it's the same with rhythm.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#22
Quote by GNRrocka

Using your thumb works if you have long enough fingers, but is a horrible habit to start, once you get better at guitar it'll hurt you for sure and you'll just have to change it.


How on earth could using your thumb hurt you? Wrapping the thumb around to mute strings is a good foundation for eventually using it to fret bass notes for chord/melody and stuff like that. Last time I checked it didn't hurt Jimi Hendrix. Honestly, it really can't hurt you at all unless you have little midget sausage link fingers. In that case, it's time to pick up the drums. In any case, if you don't want to use your thumb, just let your index finger poke out a little more so that it mutes the E string.
#24
Quote by XeRoXyoS
Okay, to be honest, you guys are confusing me even more.

C then, pick option C.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#25
I use my middle finger to mute the sixth string WHILE trying not to hit it. So I'm muting it just to be sure if I accidentally hit it.
#26
Quote by XeRoXyoS
Okay, to be honest, you guys are confusing me even more.


OK, In my opinion, I would go with C for normal songs, as I always prefer to use the most precise way to pick, however I rest my palm on the highest string when I'm not using it as a habit, and this reduces the chance of a massive ring out in case of a mistake. If it was something too fast for me to cleanly do option C, I would consider middle finger or thumb muting, OR moving it up 5 frets (depending on your tuning) and playing it with a root note on the 6th string.

You can do it anyway you want truthfully, but I've always prefered to get into the habit of trying to see whether I can pick something cleanly before I resort to muting.
#27
I personally actually do all three and that's how I teach it as well, having mutliple methods going is always a good idea just in case one of them fails for whatever reason.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#28
Option C. That confront the problem, and when you sort it, you will be a better player in the end. The others just try to make a bad situation sightly better, but still not ideal.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#29
IMO option A is the best.



Mute the 6th string with the tip of your first finger.

Option C seems not that good, because you can just mute it like I showed above. It's not hard and you don't have to pay attention to your picking hand.
Last edited by Thunderstorm at Sep 8, 2008,
#30
precision is vital you need to work on that slow your stuff down until your missing that e string.

however, when your jamming and your jumpin around stage and what not it would be hard not to eff up and hit it occasionally so i recommend a mixture of muting the string with your fretted finger make sure AND trying as hard as you can to not hit it.

and keep in mind if you sound bad you've only been playing for 7 months and you probably have a ways to go with gaining your absolute "oneness" with the guitar

hope i helped and sorry if some1 else has already said this didnt feel like reading 100 ways to play a power chord.

good luck
sieves

edit: btw ez way out is fast track to being trapped within what you know always learn to do it RIGHT because in the long run this will always make you better.
Epiphone les paul studio
Traynor YCS50
vox wah V847
Fulltone Full-Drive 2
squire strat- currently in process of getting custom finish!


gassing for warmoth build
#31
It really wont matter in the long run, since you will end up doing A and C (Don't remember what B was, read this last night) naturally. Precision comes first always, and it's usually something that comes in time.
#32
C) Just not hitting the sixth string ( seems the least likely choice seeing as you often wont have enough time to be that precise)


You always have time to be precise. It's just a question of whether you have the skill to be precise.
This space foreclosed, due to the ailing economy.
#33
Quote by Ze_Metal
I don't mute and I'm doing fine. You can be precise, it just takes practice.


This, or mute with your index.
live to play live
#34
I change my technique depending on what I'm playing. If I'm playing something that involves a lot of up and down strumming (think smells like teen spirit), I'll go with option A. If I'm playing something that doesn't really involve strumming, but involves hitting or sustaining the power chord (think iron man), I'll go with option C
1950s Reissue Fender Stratocaster
Epiphone Gold Top Les Paul
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Ibanez TS-9
Boss BF-3
Boss DD-6
Wylde Signature Cry Baby
DigiTech Whammy 4