#1
Why is it that I've never seen a maple fretboard or neck on an acoustic but i see them all the time on electrics?
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#2
Too bright sounding on an acoustic. Don't look as nice either.
The simpleton's rig:
Fender Roadhouse Stratocaster
Homemade Fuzz pedal "the chainsaw"
Peavey Valveking 212.
#3
really? that's all? i would want to try it....
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#4
yeah too bright. rosewood is also denser so it transfers string vibrations more efficiently from string to fret to neck woods which is not nearly as important on an electric as it is on an acoustic because on an unamplified acoustic the body's vibration is the only source of amplification for the string sounds. thats also why almost all acoustics have mahogany necks.
#5
gotchya....
In your eyes I see the darkness that tourments you, and in your head where it dwells, I'll give you my hand if you reach out and grab it, let's walk away from this hell.
#6
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
yeah too bright. rosewood is also denser so it transfers string vibrations more efficiently from string to fret to neck woods which is not nearly as important on an electric as it is on an acoustic because on an unamplified acoustic the body's vibration is the only source of amplification for the string sounds. thats also why almost all acoustics have mahogany necks.


You might want to rethink that argument. You assert that rosewood is better than maple because it is more dense than maple. Next you say that this is important in order to promote transfer of vibrations. Then you claim that this is also why mahogany necks are most common on acoustics. That does not follow because mahogany is typically less dense than maple.