#2
Look into Jazz. The II V I is one of Jazz's most common chord progressions.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#3
Tune Up is mainly 2-5-1's. Perdido and Softly As In A Morning Sunrise as well. Really most jazz standards use them so if you you can recognize them then you'll know a lot of songs with 2-5-1's.
12 fret fury
#4
Quote by Punk Poser
Tune Up is mainly 2-5-1's. Perdido and Softly As In A Morning Sunrise as well. Really most jazz standards use them so if you you can recognize them then you'll know a lot of songs with 2-5-1's.


ok i know this is completely noobi but Tune Up as in tuneing? and perdido i know i could use google but im lazy as **** care to explain?
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
Isnt Giant steps (coltrane) created using a couple of ii-V-I movements?

The head has a few in there, among other stuff.
#8
This progression seems more common in jazz and pop, which may explain why I couldn't find any good Metallica Sabbath etc. examples for below.

The 2 chord comes in two common flavors, normal is minor ("ii"), the other is major ("II"), when its a secondary dominant leading into the V chord ("V of V")


ii

Tears in Heaven - Clapton
key = A
end of verse:
"Cause I know (Bm)...I don't belong (E)... Here in heaven (A)"

My Sweet Lord - George Harrison
key = E
end of verse:
"My sweet Lord (F#m) .. (B) really want to (E) see you"

Layla - Clapton
key (verse) = E
end of verse:
(F#m) "Nobody's (B) waiting by your (E) side..."

With A Little Help From My Friends - Beatles
key = E
verse:
"Would you (F#m) stand up and (B) walk out on (E) me.."


II

Honky Tonk Women - Stones
key = G
verse:
".. (A) upstairs ... for a (D) ride.... (G)

Thank You - Led Zep
key = D
pre-chorus:
"Kind of woman that ... (E) (A)..(D)
(I forget the mumbled words in between E and A chords)
(first time thru it goes to a C chord instead of D chord but subsequent times goes to D)

You Really Got Me - Kinks
key = G (or A for Van Halen version)
entire song is basically a I - II - V progression if you look at big picture rather then the individual chords that make up the riff

All You Need is Love - Beatles
key = G
chorus = G A D
#9
Another pop song that uses II V Is in the chorus is Eric Clapton's version of Change the World (I know there are other but not if they vary or not so I'll use his for conveniences sake) he plays D#min7b5 -> G#7 -> C#min7. Minor II V I in C minor(duh!)


Ok, so II V I. I'll explain it a bit. I'm assuming you understand basic major scale harmony.


The major II V I is made up by the three following chords: minor -> dominant -> major. The reason for this is because as the name of the progression indicates, the first chord is built off the second degree(minor chord), the second chord is built off the fifth degree(dominant) and the last chord in the progression is built off the tonic.(major). If you don't understand why the chords are major or minor you have to revise your major scale harmony.

In a more practical example:


Cmajor scale: C D E F G A B 

                    [B]II      V       I
[/B]
II V I in C major: Dmin7 -> G7 -> Cmaj7. 


It's good practise for you to go through the II V Is in all keys going around the circle of fifths.


Most jazz standards have a II V I in there somewhere(though there are some that don't) so it's helpful if you find a realbook online or something similar and go through the standards just spotting the II V Is in the tune. Beware, some are more disguised than others.
#10
a quick skim of the 'New Real Book ' shows ii-V-I's used in:

Affirmation
Airegin
Angel Eyes
Anthropology
Autumn Leaves
Basin Street Blues
Beautiful Love
Bernie's Tune
Bird Food
Black Ice

i.e. about 95% tunes in that thing... all over the place in Jazz
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