#2
depending on how good your theory is you can just write a cool sounding lead line, then take every thing up or down a major 3rd or 6th
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#3
harmony is freakin sweet... double over your selected part either an octave higher or lower depending on pitch of the original line. its usually higher though and almost always sounds freakin sweeter than tea...
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#4
Quote by NnjRik
depending on how good your theory is you can just write a cool sounding lead line, then take every thing up or down a major 3rd or 6th


+1 to this. Harmonizing using diatonic 3rds sounds good.
#6
Quote by joshua029
harmony is freakin sweet... double over your selected part either an octave higher or lower depending on pitch of the original line. its usually higher though and almost always sounds freakin sweeter than tea...


That's how Metallica does it and the advantage is, that it never sounds out of tune, or innapropriate. But the downside is that it's not that interesting after couple of lines

Listen to the guy above, who talked about 3rd's and 6th's and my advice would be to experiment and find what works for you.

Also, classical music has a rule, that harmonies sound even better if you use an interval for 3 notes in a row. So, 3 notes harmonized in an octave, are followed by 1, 2 or 3 in 3rd's or whatever. You get the idea.
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#8
Quote by gab4554
No.. I know how to use 3rd 6th and octaves. But I just dont know how to write them. Like should I use scales or something like that ?

If you have a single note line on say the top e string like this

-5-7-8

Harmonizing that using diatonic 3rds would be

-8-10-12

That's a very simple idea in the key of A minor or C major.
#9
Dude, you write a melody line, like, for example, 3 sixteenth notes on the B string:

B (open string), C# (2nd fret), D (3rd fret)

followed by a quarter note on the E string:

B (5th fret)


E|----------5-|
B|-0-2-3-----|


Then you harmonize it using different intervals by alternating the pitch of these notes to be played by another guitar. (I'll make it simple enough to play it on one guitar even)


E|-2-5-5--5-|
B|------------|


Which has a 5th and an octave.

And a harmony is born
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Last edited by Ed T H at Sep 8, 2008,
#10
Quote by mdc
+1 to this. Harmonizing using diatonic 3rds sounds good.

Yes but, to quote my music teacher, too much sounds just makes it the rugrats.

It's usually better to harmonize using a variety of intervals instead of just one. Another thing to remeber is to use contrary motion - when one part is going upwards, make the other part go downwards. Also, the best way to harmonize is to get a piano (or someone else to play one point) and just play around till you get some notes that sound good because, unless you know what all 13 possible intervals (including unisons and octaves) sound like, theory will only help you so much.

I did a harmonizing exercise in GCSE music today where we had a ground bass (a repeating bassline) of all minims and we harmonized to it - first with just minims for one repetition, then crotchets, then quavers and then for two repitions any rythm.

You can try this out with any ground bass but our notes where: C, E, A, C(octave lower), F, D, F and G. All the notes are within the original middle C and the octave lower C (i had this on a stave).

This ground bass was quite interesting for many reasons, but mainly because it doesn't end on the tonic (it ends on the dominant) so you have to get your treble part to end well and not make the listener expect more (i found that ending on C didn't work very well).

PS, don't describe any repeating bassline as a ground bass because it is usually only used to describe a repeating basslin in baroque music (which was written from 1600 to 1750).