#1
Is Aeolian the natural minor scale? if I want to play the Natural minor
scale in E could I use the Aeolian shape?
#3
Quote by newguitars08
Is Aeolian the natural minor scale? if I want to play the Natural minor
scale in E could I use the Aeolian shape?


They have the same notes, so you could use the "aeolian shape", yes. I would strongly advise learning the major scale all over the fretboard, as well as the theory behind, since scales are not "shapes", and every scale spans the entire fretboard. Keep in mind that, even though they have the same notes, it would be misleading to say that aeolian is natural minor, since the two terms imply different musical systems. Most likely, you are not playing modally.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Archeo Avis
They have the same notes, so you could use the "aeolian shape", yes. I would strongly advise learning the major scale all over the fretboard, as well as the theory behind, since scales are not "shapes", and every scale spans the entire fretboard. Keep in mind that, even though they have the same notes, it would be misleading to say that aeolian is natural minor, since the two terms imply different musical systems. Most likely, you are not playing modally.

Agreed.
#5
They are, in basic esscence, the same thing. The same goes for Major/Ionian. The Aeolian mode is the 6th mode of the major scale, and the 1st of the narural minor scale, so E natural minor/aeolian would be the relative minor of G Major/Ionian
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#6
Quote by newguitars08
Is Aeolian the natural minor scale? if I want to play the Natural minor
scale in E could I use the Aeolian shape?


sure you can.

aeolian shape = natural minor shape

Quote by Archeo Avis
it would be misleading to say that aeolian is natural minor, since the two terms imply different musical systems. Most likely, you are not playing modally.


Not really. My college text explains that Aeolian exists as the natural minor scale. it also says that whether you refer to it as Aeolian or natural minor is "of no consequence".

the formulas are the same
the sound is them same
the notes function the same
the patterns on the guitar neck are the same

A composition written purely in natural minor, will follow the same "system" as a composition written in aeolian. While there is a historic difference ( the term Aeolian existed before natural minor), there is no musical difference.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 8, 2008,
#8
Quote by Dave_Gray
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Um, what? Why the fuck does he deserve that? Why the fuck would anyone deserve such a wretched death? Do you actually know what happens to someone who is dieing of aids, kid?
Quote by GuitarMunky
Not really. My college text explains that Aeolian exists as the natural minor scale. it also says that whether you refer to it as Aeolian or natural minor is "of no consequence".

the formulas are the same
the sound is them same
the notes function the same
the patterns on the guitar neck are the same

A composition written purely in natural minor, will follow the same "system" as a composition written in aeolian. While there is a historic difference ( the term Aeolian existed before natural minor), there is no musical difference.
Technically, when they're written down, they are perfectly the same. Same notes, same formula and so on.

But in practise, minor based music will use elements of all three minor scales (natural, melodic and harmonic). Depending on the situation, a composer might use a natural seventh or natural sixth or whatever instead of the intervals listed in the natural minor scale.

Aeolian based music, on the other hand, wouldnt really require those natural sevenths and sixths that minor based music usually has. Generally pre-baroque music was very diatonic (meaning it barely ever included out of key notes), so modal music in this aspect meant using the same seven notes.

Truth be told, I'm not even sure if aeolian was used that much back in the gregorian modal chants times.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight

But in practise, minor based music will use elements of all three minor scales (natural, melodic and harmonic). Depending on the situation, a composer might use a natural seventh or natural sixth or whatever instead of the intervals listed in the natural minor scale.


In practice you can do what you want. if you write something that is strictly from the natural minor scale, it would be the same as if you wrote something strictly from the aeolian modal scale.

its as simple as this: aeolian = natural minor........ in formula, sound and function.
shred is gaudy music