#1
okay, heres a call for help from longtime lurker and occasional poster, myself.
I'm applying for Bachelor of Music program at a university, and their audition requires four peices from:
Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century.

I basically know nothing about them, except for twentieth century i think i could swing by with some Marty Friedman or Cacophony (Concerto).

so i've been doing some searching for possible peices and all I've discovered so far is that Ana Vidovic is beautiful and awesome lol. I need peices that will challenge me, I have 6 months to prepare them, but aren't impossible because even though i have a classical and improvise using my own wacky fingerpicking style, i don't actually know any classical peices. if anyone has suggestions for those three periods please share them
#2
My audition was the same, when I get home, I'll give you some names. And I don't think the Marty Friedman will go over well. I go to a university, in fact I'm in the music library right now. People here look down on metal and that kind of stuff. I have a syllabus and I'll post some pieces later when I get home. Work on it every day. 6 months sounds like a lot, it's nothing if your technique isn't up to standard yet. So keep working.

My audition pieces were
Fantasia - William Byrd
Sarabande BWV 565 (I think) - JS Bach
Romanza - Nicolo Paganini
Some early blues jazz sort of thing, don't remember.
#3
Yeah, despite what so many non-classical players think shred is almost certainly NOT going to work. Look up Francisco Tarrega, his works are Romantic-era iirc. Bach is always good for Baroque-era selections.
Can you read sheet music? If not I'd suggest learning NOW, btw.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Sep 8, 2008,
#5
Thanks for the advice, guys. I've already planned out everything else I need to do, such as learning to sight read, practicing interval recognition and stuff because that will all be on a test. I have enough theory to pass the test, I've looked at a sample test they have up, but to be safe I'm going to learn as much as I can and put more time into applying it. I decided I'm going to get lessons from a classical teacher too, to try keep my technique as flawless as I can.
And I do have a classical, read post

I'll check out those pieces suggested, but on another note I don't see Friedman as 'shred'. I think of him as extremely capable (capable as in creating whatever tension/mood/melody he desires) and soulful, even in his metal stuff. But I was planning on doing one of his softer more compositional pieces, like Valley of Eternity or Realm of the Senses.
#7
By contemporary they mean contemporary classical. Some Villalobos should do the trick. Do you have a list of pieces as a reference or guide? That might be helpful because you can ask your teacher for pieces of the same style.
#8
its pretty clear that you are applying for a program in classical guitar. If you want to get in and succeed in doing well in the program you better throw your electric in the closet and say hello to your new friend! If you want to do a college program get a GOOD teacher that has done a classical guitar degree to make sure you get set on the right path. Classical guitar is fun as hell.
#9
If you want to get a good idea of repitore, pick up an RCM guitar syllabus book. It lists graded pieces from 1-10 and organizes them based on their time period (baroque, contemporary.. etc). If you went in and performed a piece by marty friedman they would probably reject you just based on those grounds because it shows ignorance to the program. When they say contemporary, they dont mean rock, metal, blues they mean contemporary classical works arranged for classical guitar. If you start playing some piece thats not idiomatic to the classical guitar then your screwed.
#10
its not a classical guitar program.. its a Bachelor of Music program, with my primary instrument being guitar, but yea there is classical invovled.
I phoned the head of the department a while back and she said they have students like me, who come from electric/metal whatever background who still do well in the program. and where did you pick up the word contemporary? i've only mentioned twentieth century, is that the same as contemporary or something?
but anyway, since there's no books of that sort available around here, the closest thing there is is a classical guitar teacher about an hour away. I'm going to get lessons from him and get his recommendation on pieces to teach me.

but last time I talked to the department head, I got the impression that it's not strictly classical, which does seem weird because of the audition requirements. but I'm going to call again to make sure.
#11
For romantic classical guitar music, I'd personally recommend some of Matteo Carcassi's work. You can probably see some videos and sheet music online.
#12
Not completely relevant, but somewhat related: What's the "audition consensus" on Beethoven? I know he's generally considered a part of the Classical period, but some of his later works were extremely progressive and served as a transition towards and inspiration for romantic music. Does it depend on the individual work, or is his work as a whole generally considered one or the other (at least, from an audition standpoint)?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
^A bit of a complicated answer to that one. We all know he was the "Bridge to Romanticism". He's still considered predominantly Classical though, and imo this is correct because he gave way to romanticism, and was heavily influenced by Mozart and Bach among others.

I remember reading somewhere that "After Beethoven, it was not only important but essential that artists follow their own path and do it for the music." And that's pretty much what romanticism was. Also, in a BBC Documentary, I remember "He would be a huge influence on 19th century romantics like Chopin" which means that he wasn't considered romantic, at least not back then. So.. I guess since he started as more of a Cassical musician, he'll be considered one. Mixed opinions really.

I'm glad I could clear that up (not).
#14
Not completely relevant, but somewhat related: What's the "audition consensus" on Beethoven? I know he's generally considered a part of the Classical period, but some of his later works were extremely progressive and served as a transition towards and inspiration for romantic music. Does it depend on the individual work, or is his work as a whole generally considered one or the other (at least, from an audition standpoint)?


Almost all major conservatories have this requirement for piano performance...

One classical piano sonata by either Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven.

But despite that, if say, you were fool enough to attempt the op 111 piano sonata for your "Major Romantic Work" (another popular audition requirement) then there is no doubt in my mind that they would accept it, assuming you didn't play an early classical sonata by Beethoven beforehand.

There is a humongous difference between Beethoven's Sonata no 1 op 2 no 1, and Beethoven's Sonata no 32 op 111. I would venture to say though that from Op 31 no 2 (The Tempest) onwards could be comfortably considered romantic.
#15
By 20th Century I would assume they are referring to 20th century composers like Stravinsky and Bartok.
12 fret fury
#16
i hear they are suckers fo jaz music as well, very good posts in this thread also, be sure to search your topic there are lots of great threads on this already, they should help you out
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#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
Not completely relevant, but somewhat related: What's the "audition consensus" on Beethoven? I know he's generally considered a part of the Classical period, but some of his later works were extremely progressive and served as a transition towards and inspiration for romantic music. Does it depend on the individual work, or is his work as a whole generally considered one or the other (at least, from an audition standpoint)?

I think he is mostly considered classical, but if you were asked for an example of a classical composer in an aural test (for example) most people would not say Beethoven, preffering to use a composer who was just classical. In an audition I would guess that if it was a classical sounding piece you could use it for classical, however i'm not so sure if the same would work for a romantic sounding one.
#18
Quote by Ead
its not a classical guitar program..


I failed.. lol. After consulting the department head again, I see now it IS strictly classical. They have jazz ensembles, but it's all classical based. I didn't think the whole university deal was that centered. My ignorance has shown itself, sorry for wasting all your time, because I don't really want to immerse myself in classical guitar for 4 years..

So I found another uni which offers a specialization in Jazz studies, I think that's what I'll go for. I probably sound like a retard turning around such a huge decision and test of abilities like that, but I'm more inclined toward jazz than classical. I was hoping the first uni would give more freedom in practice and performance. Atleast in jazz, I'm going to be using a pick, something I'm already familiar with, and get the opportunity to practice my favourite thing to do.. improv! all I need for this is a jazz standard and an etude.. I'm now going to immerse myself in jazz.
#19
all I need for this is a jazz standard


Take Five.

Everyone else is wrong.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
Take Five.

Everyone else is wrong.

Does that work well on solo guitar? I've only seen it done with groups of brass instruments.
#21
Quote by 12345abcd3
Does that work well on solo guitar? I've only seen it done with groups of brass instruments.


He'll find a way.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Quote by Ead

So I found another uni which offers a specialization in Jazz studies, I think that's what I'll go for. I probably sound like a retard turning around such a huge decision and test of abilities like that, but I'm more inclined toward jazz than classical. I was hoping the first uni would give more freedom in practice and performance. Atleast in jazz, I'm going to be using a pick, something I'm already familiar with, and get the opportunity to practice my favourite thing to do.. improv! all I need for this is a jazz standard and an etude.. I'm now going to immerse myself in jazz.


I think you will enjoy jazz guitar, its alot of fun. I wouldn't worry about the audition much if your a first year student, you can versions of jazz standards that aren't too difficult to play. If you don't know how to read sheet music or much about theory I would take music 101, or music fundamentals. It's sort of a pre req to music theory 1, assuming your school offers it. If it does then you should be able to read sheet music pretty well by the end of the course and some basic theory as its designed for people who know nothing about either. Good luck.
#23
Archeo: I just checked out some performances of it on youtube, and I love it! super groove.. found some interesting solo arrangements, but I can't say right now I can audition with it, we'll see :P

thanks, blueriver (un)fortunately I can't take a music class cause I'm done highschool lol. I know some theory already, but not sheet music. that will probably be my biggest problem.. I think I can get a teacher who can help me out though.
#24
Quote by Ead
(un)fortunately I can't take a music class cause I'm done highschool lol. I know some theory already, but not sheet music. that will probably be my biggest problem.. I think I can get a teacher who can help me out though.


You mean you are done with highschool? MUS 101 is a college class

And if you aren't done theres usually some sort of program that allows you to take a some college classes while your a senior.