#1
Sup UG community, and all those reading. Today I heard the strangest news in my band class. I heard that in Germany there is in fact 8 notes in a scale, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and.... H!
is this stuff true or is my class just a bunch crazy people cause this is really amazing and really changes my perspective on how i play guitar and what not
well peace out world and thanks for comments
#3
yes
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#4
H is some subsitution for a note we have. I think its B. I don't know who uses that though, I've seen it a few times.

It's not a different note.
#5
Yes.

H is what we know as B. Their B is what we know as Bb. I'm not sure if this is still in practice, though.

Bach actually signed the last fugue that he wrote by having a melody consisting of the notes B-A-C-H (Bb-A-C-B).
known as Jeff when it really matters
#11
thanks guys and actually I have now learned from which ones pink that wikipedia has almost all truths but also H replaced B and B was Bb I think it was in north europe and scandinavia in Bach's time
#12
Quote by which ones pink
Ignorance is bliss isn't it?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_notes


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_notes#History_of_note_names


In parts of Europe, including Germany, Poland and Russia, the natural symbol transformed into the letter H: in German music notation, H is B♮ (B-natural) and B is B♭ (B-flat).
#14
Slightly off topic but interesting:
Whats really confusing is when i visit my family in Cyprus, both my cousins are bass players in bands, and also play guitar...

If i try and jam with them, they shout things like "Do Re Mi Fa" to me!!!

Notes there aren't A B C D E F G, but Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do!!!
#17
Quote by confusius
Do = C
Re = D

and so on.

Do can be any note, Do-Re-mi ect. are just scale degrees so thery correspond to intervals, not notes.

eg, If I say do is C the re will be D, but if i say do is A then re will be B.
#18
That's true in Solfa (or whatever it's called).


But living in Spain I can tell you that Do is C. Then if you are playing in a different key rather than saying that Do is G or whatever you just add the alterations like you would in English. So using G, it would be: Sol La Si Do Re Mi Fa#(in Spanish called sostenido).

I don't know why it's like this but it's definitely right and it's definitely convention. I assume his friends do the same.
#19
Quote by confusius
That's true in Solfa (or whatever it's called).


But living in Spain I can tell you that Do is C. Then if you are playing in a different key rather than saying that Do is G or whatever you just add the alterations like you would in English. So using G, it would be: Sol La Si Do Re Mi Fa#(in Spanish called sostenido).

I don't know why it's like this but it's definitely right and it's definitely convention. I assume his friends do the same.

Ok, though his cousins are from cyprus so they could use it either way.

Solfa is very useful for your transposition skills and it would be quite cool if they just jammed by using whatever root note they wanted then calling out solfa.
#20
Man that would drive me nutty. The common practise which I think also applies to other European countries like France and Italy is much easier.
#21
Quote by confusius
That's true in Solfa (or whatever it's called).


But living in Spain I can tell you that Do is C. Then if you are playing in a different key rather than saying that Do is G or whatever you just add the alterations like you would in English. So using G, it would be: Sol La Si Do Re Mi Fa#(in Spanish called sostenido).

I don't know why it's like this but it's definitely right and it's definitely convention. I assume his friends do the same.

Depending on where you are located, Solfege is used two different ways. One way is with "moveable Do", where Do represents the root of the key, and so forth regardless of the key you choose. The other way is called "Fixed Do" or "Non-moveable Do". At these schools and areas, Do is ALWAYS the note C, regardless of the key.

At Berklee, we used moveable Do, but were informed of this irregularity depending on where you go and who you study with. There were transfer students from other music schools and other parts of the world that had a hard time getting used to seeing moveable Do because they were brought up learning fixed Do.

Just a little info for you.
#22
In romania, we use fixed Do.

Do = C
Re = D
so on

Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si
C D E F G A B

Do# is C#, so on
#27
Quote by 12345abcd3
Only as retarded as any other name you would give to notes. Which is not very.


it seems very cumbersome to have to remember an alternate name for every note. its a lot easier to just have each syllable represent a scale degree... natch
#28
Quote by CAT ASS MILK
it seems very cumbersome to have to remember an alternate name for every note. its a lot easier to just have each syllable represent a scale degree... natch

1. We have alternate names for every note. A is different to B.
2. Do-rah-mi are all syllables
3. A scale degree is note the same as a note. We represent numbers as scale degrees and the number 1 can be anything and all the other notes are derives as intervals from that. Movable do-re-mi is also an example of scale degrees.
#29
it seems very cumbersome to have to remember an alternate name for every note. its a lot easier to just have each syllable represent a scale degree... natch



Or you could make the effort to learn it? I've learnt all my life using do re mi in the fixed do solfege system (thanks for the correct terms PSM ) and when I started learning popular music and learning from American harmony books I had to acquaint to the A B C system. It wasn't too hard. Maybe you should try to broaden your knowledge by working in fixed do for a while.
#30
Quote by 12345abcd3
Do can be any note, Do-Re-mi ect. are just scale degrees so thery correspond to intervals, not notes.

eg, If I say do is C the re will be D, but if i say do is A then re will be B.


rofl, wrong

in Spain, ppl dont use "A B C D E F G"

when we learn the notes we learn "Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do"

that is:

Do = C
Re = D
Mi = E
Fa = F
Sol = G
La = A
Si = B
Do = C
...

A can NEVER be "Do", Do is C all day
#31
Same in Cyprus, Do = C and is always C. Doesn't float around.

Didn't think I'd get you lot discussing this so much after mentioning it
#32
Quote by confusius
Or you could make the effort to learn it? I've learnt all my life using do re mi in the fixed do solfege system (thanks for the correct terms PSM ) and when I started learning popular music and learning from American harmony books I had to acquaint to the A B C system. It wasn't too hard. Maybe you should try to broaden your knowledge by working in fixed do for a while.

You got it. Changing from one system to the next can be extremely frustrating for people who start studying somewhere else and have grown up or spent the past few years using the other system.
#33
Quote by Ze_Metal
Gold.

Apart from the fact Hitler was from Austria
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#34
Quote by Gacel
rofl, wrong

in Spain, ppl dont use "A B C D E F G"

when we learn the notes we learn "Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do"

that is:

Do = C
Re = D
Mi = E
Fa = F
Sol = G
La = A
Si = B
Do = C
...

A can NEVER be "Do", Do is C all day

rofl, failure to read rest of thread!!!!1111!!!

What you are talkking about is called fixed-do, where do can only be C. What i was talking about was movable-do, where Do can be any note and with Re, Mi ect. being the corresponding note in the major scale of whatever note Do was.

If you'd read the rest of the thread i wouldn't have to tell you this.
#35
Quote by Gacel
rofl, wrong

in Spain, ppl dont use "A B C D E F G"

when we learn the notes we learn "Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do"

that is:

Do = C
Re = D
Mi = E
Fa = F
Sol = G
La = A
Si = B
Do = C
...

A can NEVER be "Do", Do is C all day


we studied movable Do here. tonic = do always.

Both systems are valid.
shred is gaudy music
#36
Gacel, no, you're wrong. Go back and read my previous post. There are two different Solfege systems used depending on what area of the world you are in and what school (or teacher) you are studying at.

In Spain (at least where you studied or are studying), the Fixed Do system is used. In this case, the syllables (Do Di Re Ri Mi etc) are associated with specific notes (C C# D D# E etc) and do not change. Do will always equal C regardless of the key you are in.

In other areas and schools, such as Berklee College of Music where I graduated from, the other Solfege system, Moveable Do, is used. In this case, the syllabes (Do Di Re Ri Mi etc) are associated with the scale degrees, not the actual notes. Therefore, the note they correspond with change depending on the key of the melody.

For example, let's look at a simple melody in the key of G Major: "G A B G D G"

In Spain (where you learned) and some areas, this would be solfeged as "Sol La Ti Sol Re Sol".

At Berklee (where I learned) and other areas, this would be solfeged as "Do Re Mi Do Sol Do".

Different systems for different areas. If you are studying solfege at a school or with a well-known teacher, they should have made you aware of both systems and their use because regardless of which system they utilized and you grew up with, you are bound to come across the other system at some point if you travel at all.
#37
hey I admit didnt know about that movable system, Im sorry if I sounded too conceited in my previous post

anyway, looking at the bright side, I learned something new! ^^