#1
What would be some good chords to use to get the lydian sound? Like when I change from E major to A Lydian, how can I make it sound more like lydian?

All I can think of is altering my chords.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#2
Most likely you aren't changing from E major to A lydian, and you're just playing a different position on the fretboard. If you want to play A lydian, you need to estabvlish a tonal center of A. This is most easily done with a static A major chord (or, better, an Amaj7#11 chord) or a simple vamp (A common lydian vamp would be I-II). Modes are not positions, and you are not changing modes just becaus3e you're moving your hand across the fretboard. If your song is in E major, then play E major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
I understand what your saying, and thats what I'm trying to avoid. What I tried was playing my chord progression all with A as the bass note and it didnt really do it for me.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#4
Quote by jackson001
I understand what your saying, and thats what I'm trying to avoid. What I tried was playing my chord progression all with A as the bass note and it didnt really do it for me.


What is your chord progression?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
A simple one for me to jam on, I-IV-V in E, so E, A, B. All major. Nothing special or out of the ordinary.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#6
Quote by jackson001
A simple one for me to jam on, I-IV-V in E, so E, A, B. All major. Nothing special or out of the ordinary.


Not only is that progression not modal, the V-I resolution is the strongest in diatonic harmony. That progression is very firmly in E major, so use E major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Then you're not playing modally, except for maybe E Ionian. Unless you're on each chord for a long time, you're not going to be able to establish a new tonality. That's not to insult your skill level, but it just can't be done. It's like asking someone to watch a 2 hour movie by noon, but asking them at 11am. It just can't be done.
#8
I dont feel insulted. I can play the fire out of Ionian, but I want to broaden my horizons. What are some recommendations then? What should I do to my chords?
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It's like asking someone to watch a 2 hour movie by noon, but asking them at 11am. It just can't be done.


Simpsons moment...

Put everything in one bag...but I don't want the bag to be heavy!
-- Agnes Skinner to grocery store clerk

Quote by jackson001
I dont feel insulted. I can play the fire out of Ionian, but I want to broaden my horizons. What are some recommendations then? What should I do to my chords?


I gave you some advice for playing in lydian. That said, if you're bored of the major scale, you're doing it wrong.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 8, 2008,
#10
I'm not bored, I'm curious of what else is out there. Maybe I just worded that wrong.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#12
I'd like too, but I'm still new to a lot of theory. I know what lydian sounds like and I know that it is a major scale with a #4, but some of the terminology, like a "modal vamp" is foreign to me. So, yes I want to do what Arch said, but I need it broken down a little if possible.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#13
Quote by jackson001
I'd like too, but I'm still new to a lot of theory. I know what lydian sounds like and I know that it is a major scale with a #4, but some of the terminology, like a "modal vamp" is foreign to me. So, yes I want to do what Arch said, but I need it broken down a little if possible.


Modes are harmonically weak, so modal progression are generally designed to outline the intervals of the mode, rather than to create a sense of "movement" and dissonance, which is then resolved (as in key based music). Put simply, you could say that modal harmony is non-functional. A "vamp", in this case, is a very simply sequence of one or two chords that is repeated over an over. Vamps are common when dealing with modes because complex progressions tend to resolve to the relative major (or, less commonly, minor) for the simple reason that they're harmonically stronger. In the case of the lydian mode, a common vamp would be I-II (in the case of F lydian: F major - G major). This may remind you of a I-IV-V progression in C major (C major - F major - G major), but since the the IV chord is harmonically strong, it can function as a tonic as well, so, as long as you don't introduce a C major chord, F major can function just fine as a tonal center. Alternately, you can use a bassline to establish F as the tonal center, or base your melody around an Fmaj7 chord, which is very suggestive of lydian. The most important thing is that you maintain a tonal center of F.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Lydian has a sharp 4.

You need to clearly establish the tonic and use chords that have that note present to bring out the Lydian flavour.

The biggest trouble I find with Lydian is using the V chord. It's hard to approach. But the vii is a good substitute.

Lydian triads
I II iii #ivᴼ V vi vii

So A Lydian triads are A B C#m D#ᴼ E F#m G#m

The chords that contain the modal note are the II #ivᴼ and vii

Try something like I II vii I

Of course you could always extend the chords to bring the #4 into some of the other chords. In A Lydian a C#sus2 would include the modal note (D#). So too would an EMaj7. etc. etc. etc.

I iiisus2 vii

Another possibility might be I iiisus2 II Vmaj7

or I #ivᴼ vii
Si
#15
Thanks everyone, now I can understand what you're saying quite a bit better. I wish I knew more theory, the modes just fascinate me because of their sound.
Fender 60th MIA Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Peavey JSX

Rockman Stereo Echo
Rockman Sustainor 200
2 Rockman 12-Band EQs
Rockman Stereo Chorus
RE-20 Space Echo
fulltone Clyde Standard wah

*No Advertising*
#16
www.musictheory.net

Teach a man to fish...
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.