#1
ok so i'm in this music theory class at school and it just started so we are doing all the ez stuff like interval ear training, scales (major, minor harmonic m melodic minor) and we took a test today over all of this stuff now i have had much more experience with this stuff so it came ezily to me and i got finished well b4 expected

newho, because of time issues at the same class hour my teacher teaches music theory he also teaches AP music theory and after i finished my test i watched the AP lesson. and they are all still doing review from what they learned last year but it was still beyond me.

so anyway he was talking about writing melodies using your basic key signatures and cadences.

question number 1: i have gathered that a cadence is a rythm to the lead part. Is this correct? and if so is there any rule to writing your own cadence?

question number 2:Are there any basic rules of thumb to follow when you are writing a melody over that cadence?

and question 3: If you don't feel like answering my specific question could you please direct me to a person or lesson that will clear up my question?
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#3
Cadences are actually ways to end music, just little phrases that tell the listener the piece is over.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
I've heard "cadence" in relation to music used in several fashions, though the one that I'm most familiar with is that it's essentially an ending to a piece. It's the series of chord changes that lend themselves to giving the last chord (played or implied) that sounding of finality that it has. There are several different kind of cadences such as a plagal cadence, imperfect cadence, perfect cadence...and they each lend a different sense of finality to the piece. Cadences can also be used to lend a feeling of temporary finality to a phrase that is resolved. As far as rules to writing a melody over a rhythm part, I don't believe there are any strict rules other than "if it doesn't sound good to you, don't do it." It obviously helps to write each with the same time signature feel, but even that is not necessary. When you deviate from that you get hemiolas and polyrhythms and such.
#5
A cadence can refer to a rhythm, but in theory it normally refers to the last couple of chords in a phrase, like V-I, V-vi, I-V, etc.
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#6
thank you all for the input i apreciate it greatly.
Epiphone les paul studio
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#8
Quote by CAT ASS MILK
click my link, ignore the other replies please

i will never ignore advice given in an honest attempt to help me... your link was greatly appreciated though.
thank you all
Epiphone les paul studio
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vox wah V847
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#9
Quote by CAT ASS MILK
click my link, ignore the other replies please


Why? The other replies are correct.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
I wish my school had AP Music Theory.

I guess your question has already been answered, so there's no real reason for me to post.
#11
Quote by CAT ASS MILK
click my link, ignore the other replies please
You're consistantly being an ass, and not the kind that Arch and I are.

*reported* for general idiocy.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You're consistantly being an ass, and not the kind that Arch and I are.

*reported* for general idiocy.
Ofcourse, because your the good kind of ass.

Cadences arent just used when ending whole peices, but also phrases. There are cadences like the half-cadence that isnt used to end peices, but at the end of phrases.

When ending a melody over a cadence, you can either end the melody on a weak beat (feminine ending, lighter) or on a strong beat (masculine ending, sounds stronger?). The strongest beat in any timing is the first beat, the next strongest beat in 4/4 timing is the third beat (but this would still be classified as feminine by some people). 3/4 has only one strong beat and 2 equally weak beats.

Also, if you want to end your peice, you should probably resolve your melody. To do this, make the last note of your melody the tonic note. In C major, this would be C. In A minor, this would be A. You get the drift. You can sometimes resolve a peice on the fifth (sometimes), but I think this only really works in major peices.

To do this effectively, a M7 (this is an accidental in minor peices) or a M2 or a #4 (only if your going to resolve on the fifth) should be used in the last phrase. Potentially a m2 and m7 would work, but not as well. What works best is using a M2 or a M7 as the second last note and moving stepwise to the root, but you dont always need to do this (some teachers would say you always have to, but they suck). Use your ear as much as your head.