#1
my takimine jumbo series does not have a bridge pin...would dis affect the guitar sound? i sometimes hear the e string "ring"
#2
Does not have bridge pins? How are the strings attached to the body?
#4
Quote by Akabilk
Does not have bridge pins? How are the strings attached to the body?


What, you never heard of a pinless bridge before?
Here's one that Breedlove offers:

#5
you mean like this one? http://elderly.com/new_instruments/items/EG523SC.htm

pinless bridge guitars shouldn't have much of a difference in tone. As long as the break angle of the string makes good contact with the saddle then it should be alright. bridge pins usually make a little difference in tone, but not much. Through-body stringing systems are generally much quicker to change strings on. that's one of the beauties of it. I was at a Don Ross and Andy Mckee concert in Toronto and Don broke a string before he played the first song. he finish restringing in under 30 seconds. Tuning the string took like 8x as long though, haha.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
Quote by captivate
you mean like this one? http://elderly.com/new_instruments/items/EG523SC.htm

pinless bridge guitars shouldn't have much of a difference in tone. As long as the break angle of the string makes good contact with the saddle then it should be alright. bridge pins usually make a little difference in tone, but not much. Through-body stringing systems are generally much quicker to change strings on. that's one of the beauties of it. I was at a Don Ross and Andy Mckee concert in Toronto and Don broke a string before he played the first song. he finish restringing in under 30 seconds. Tuning the string took like 8x as long though, haha.



hey that guitar looks farmiliar.. lol ok thank you.
#7
Quote by LeftyDave
What, you never heard of a pinless bridge before?


No, I've never seen one in Aust. Neat idea. I have seen a Takamine Jumbo though and it had bridge pins, so that's why my original question. Maybe they have a new model that doesn't [?]
#8
If I'm not mistaken, quite a few ovations have pinless bridges as well.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
After thinking about these pinless bridges, I'm wondering about their longevity rather than their novelty value. The stress is all 'with the grain' [the weakest part] on the bridge, not across the grain as with pins [the strongest part]. Although the bridge looks thicker than a normal bridge, the stress is still across the grain [in six places] unless they have reversed the normal bridge grain profile. It will be interesting to see how they last long term. I have some doubts, but only time will tell.
I do like the idea though, especially if the normal bridge grain profile was reversed. However, that might create problems with the saddle [?] I know the basics of wood grain strength, but I'm no wood engineer. Gimmick or genuine advancement?
Last edited by Akabilk at Sep 11, 2008,
#10
^ You're behind the times there man. Pinless bridges have been around for a while now and have already proven themselves. The few you are seeing are examples of only one type. There are others that allow you to pass the string up through the inside of the body rather than through the tail side of the bridge. It's no gimmick and they do indeed work well and last.
And what the heck is a "wood engineer"? Wouldn't that be God? lol
#11
Quote by LeftyDave
^
And what the heck is a "wood engineer"? Wouldn't that be God? lol


A guy with an axe! lol