#1
My 12 year old son has been taking lessons now for about four months. He suddenly, about one month ago, jumped out of his shell and really progressed. We go to lessons and he tells me that he likes talking to the teacher and seeing him do new things, but once we get home, he pulls out the tabs of his favorite songs and starts playing them and never plays anything from his lessons. So I question whether or not the lessons are really necessary for him anymore. He doesn't ever work on anything, but instead is always downloading new tab. He can play about four songs nearly complete, minus solo. He is really progressing like I hoped he would. Should I keep him in lessons or should I pull him out and just let him go at his own pace? I never have to push him to practice. He never puts it down when he is at home. Plus, I have been taking lessons with him, so we jam together every evening. Just looking for opinions.
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#2
Quote by samtastic6
My 12 year old son has been taking lessons now for about four months. He suddenly, about one month ago, jumped out of his shell and really progressed. We go to lessons and he tells me that he likes talking to the teacher and seeing him do new things...
Then why on earth would you cancel them? Sounds like they're doing good to me.
#3
im not a parent, but i think its good that he is at least accepting the lessons for what they are, and still enjoys playing things that he likes. lessons can get drab..making it enjoyable is good. but then again, the lessons are necessary for the little things that help technique later on that he isnt likely to pick up without guidance.

sounds like hes doing well.
#4
I think you should pull him out and let him progress at his own pace. Encourage him to find some other players his age at school or something because at sounds like he just wants someone to play with. And jamming with someone can be potentially much more beneficial to his playing
#5
Quote by smb
Then why on earth would you cancel them? Sounds like they're doing good to me.

Remind you that lessons actually cost a lot of money.

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#6
Quote by ItWillDo
Remind you that lessons actually cost a lot of money.
I don't care. I'm not responsible for their household budget. That they can afford lessons must be a given for there to be the option to continue lessons.

Learning and being taught is a more important skill than playing guitar.
#7
i think the lessons are probably part of what enables him to play what he wants. skill and style are two different things. i'd keep the lessons goin. lessons are a dedicated learning/practice time while jammin at home is fun time.
#8
I would say that he is still bennefitting from the lessons although probably at a slower pace than if he practiced the material he was learning. If he was my son, I would tell him he needed to work on his lessons at least one night out of the week if he wanted me to keep paying for them.
#9
Quote by rhettro
I would say that he is still bennefitting from the lessons although probably at a slower pace than if he practiced the material he was learning. If he was my son, I would tell him he needed to work on his lessons at least one night out of the week if he wanted me to keep paying for them.

I think that's the approach that I would take.
#11
I'm 14 and I hated lessons, but I knew people who'd had the same teacher, and turns out he couldn't teach worth a crap. Still, I enjoy learning all the techniques/theory on my own..
#12
He'll learn proper technique and such from lessons. Also, he'll learn about scales and theory, somthing I'm guessing he woulden't pursue on his own.

I agree with rhettro, have him practice what he's learning in lessons at least once a week. As an added incentive, maybe for your evening jams you could take whatever scales or chords he should be working on and spend 15 minutes working around those. For instance, if he's learning the blues scale/mixolydian mode, play a simple 12 bar progression and have him solo over it, then reverse the roles so he gets to experience soloing over an established rythem, and holding a tight rythem so someone else can solo. Overall, it'll help both his playing and yours.
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