#1
Hey what's up. I was at a music store in the town I just moved to and was trying out a goofy guitar with a computer built in to it when the owner came over and asked if I would give guitar lessons. I already work full time for good money, but I thought it over and figured why the hell not? It would be fun and it would get me practicing more than I do now. So I'm going to teach around 1.5 hours a day (3 lessons) 26 bucks an hour.

Anyhow, I'm hoping some of you beginners out there can tell me about what you are looking for in a guitar teacher. If you've had a bad teacher tell me why he sucked. If you had a good teacher tell me why you liked him.

Thanks.
#2
umm well... i really hate when my teacher teaches songs to my the "easy way" just so i can play it, if the way it sounds good is to hard for me then ill just wait. theres no ponit in learning it twice, the first time easy and when i can play it like hte original have to learn it again

EDIT: oh and i really like him cause he lends me his custom shop guitars but im a really carefull guy, he doesnt lend them to most of my friends(only during clases, i mean he doesnt lend them for me to go home practive for example )
Last edited by nithin909 at Sep 10, 2008,
#3
you were just playin a guitar and he asked you to teach....? no questions asked, no interview, just straight up he asked you to work for the store? I call BS.
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#4
just be cool with ur students unless u really hate em or theyre little douches...when theyre finding ur lessons fun/interesting theyll usually learn faster
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#5
Find out exactly what the student wants to learn before you teach anything at all; have a couple of different lesson plans so you can adapt what you teach to what they want to learn.
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#6
EDIT: Nvm, just read your profile. Sorry I thought the 94 in you name name you were born in 94. Apologies =(
#7
Quote by CrzyGuitarist93
A 14 y/o old giving lessons for $26 an hour? Seems kinda sketchy to me...


He's 22...
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#8
The thing i love the most about my guitar teacher is his enthusiasm and spirit. He doesn't want to teach me, he wants to help me learn.
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#9
My guitar teacher is very knowledgeable about bands (Progressive metal, thrash, death, etc) and hates Devil Wears Prada, Job For a Cowboy and all the other terrible "hardcore" bands so me and him get along.

In a short, general way: Find a connection, something you and your student can relate to. It makes breaking the ice sooooo much easier.
#10
Quote by CrzyGuitarist93
EDIT: Nvm, just read your profile. Sorry I thought the 94 in you name name you were born in 94. Apologies =(


It is for the year of my first car
#11
Teach them actual notes, not just frets. Explain the notes in chords that you're teaching them. My guitar teacher would just go, "This is a C major, you play it like this". Like there was no reason why it was a C major, other than the fact it was. Makes things seem harder than they are.

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#12
Thanks for the advice, it is stuff that I had mostly figured anyway. I've taught several friends how to play guitar so I have at least a little experience.

One thing I'll definitely have to brush up on is memorizing the notes on the fretboard. It sometimes takes me several seconds when I should know instantly.

Would kids rather have you teach them songs or do they actually want to learn theory? Should I teach theory even if they seem resistant to it? Personally I think I should but want to know what you guys think.
#14
Well my teacher taught me scales, and tells me to practice them all the time, but he doesn't push it on lessons, he asks for me to practice in my own time And run's through scale patterns and in chords tells the making up of a chord, like root note, 5th etc
But also introducing them to songs is good aswell, gives some variety,
Chances are that most people see themselves as a lead guitarist, so well give them what they want, and then introducing them to different styles and such
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#15
I know you're right, but when I was young I didn't give a shit about theory and I wish someone had made me learn it anyway.
#16
Quote by HLrocker
you were just playin a guitar and he asked you to teach....? no questions asked, no interview, just straight up he asked you to work for the store? I call BS.


Yeah, that's what happened. Honestly I was really surprised, thought he was joking at first until he said he was serious. It is in a very small town so maybe that has something to do with it.
#17
The one thing I love about my teacher is that he teaches me the tools in a non boring way. He is teaching my all the pentatonic scale shapes and the major and minor shapes, instead of just trying to teach me crappy greenday songs.
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#18
teach them easy songs they like but incorperate theory thats what my teacher did for example he showed what and octave was and a 1 4 5 progression just oint them out when they come up and explain the reasoning it helps because other wise there screwed when it comes to writting and they wonder if your making it up without explaination
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#19
teach them theory based on what they want to learn?

if someone wants to play a particular song, run through the scales used, the key, time signatures etc. just keep it in the context of what they want to learn and you'll be flying.
#20
just have a fun time, try to find something to connect with them and ask them to bring their mp3 or ipod so you can get a feel of what kind of music they like and maybe have them choose from there for what they want to learn.
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#21
Quote by Century
just have a fun time, try to find something to connect with them and ask them to bring their mp3 or ipod so you can get a feel of what kind of music they like and maybe have them choose from there for what they want to learn.


Yeah but don't just teach them songs, or else you have another kid who doesn't know any theory or scales.
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#23
Quote by haz_uk
teach them theory based on what they want to learn?

if someone wants to play a particular song, run through the scales used, the key, time signatures etc. just keep it in the context of what they want to learn and you'll be flying.


yea this is really good advice if they ask you to teach them a song that you think is to hard for them dont attempt because that is a waste of time and only teach the "important parts of a song" or else it will be really strange and they will think of quiting
#24
one thing i really liked that my teacher does, ive been takin lessons from him for 6 years now lol

teach musical theory, but tie it into a song they want to learn, and dont like force the kid to learn like classical songs like beethovens fifth, frarajacka star spangled banner, also when tieing in theory, make sure it goes with the song not just like outa the blue lol
#25
The first lesson should be a get to know your student lesson, if you get that out of the way quickly, you can listen to their playing and pick out some mistakes in their playing and give them exercises to help them fix those problems.

After the lesson, remember a few things about the student so you can personalise the lesson for them the next week, personalise your lesson for the student but not too much, you don't want them playing ONLY in their comfort zone, challenge them a bit
#26
This dosn't sound right to me. You got asked to teach students at a local shop just from playing, right? If that were true, then how would they be sure that you knew music theory and other guitar related things you'd need to know to teach? Alot of teachers are certified, did they ask if you were? Sorry, just seams like bull to me.

If it are true, then here's what I have to say. I just started taking lessons a little under two months ago, and I feel I have a great teacher. The first lesson I had, the two of us went over some stuff to see what I could do now. I then played with some things you'd see with bad technique, to see if he would be able to point them out, which he did. One thing I like about my teacher is, me and him are interested in the same music. He knows everything I told him I was interested in learning, such as theory, jazz and blues. After I explained to him exactly what it was I was interested in, he began to give me more then enough stuff to work on during the week. I've noticed that he mixes alot of stuff up for me to go over too, rather then having me go over simular things every time.

It's also good to show some people stretches they can do with there forearms and wrist that can prevent damage to the wrist after playing for so long. It will decrease chances of things such as carpel tunnel, and if they already have it, then it'll prevent it from hurting so much. I have it, and the stretches help me alot.

If they're just beginning, be sure to tell them to practice standing up as well when home, rather then sitting down. I notice with alot of people that they have trouble standing up and playing the same things they can play sitting down. It's also a big problem for people because they tend to bend there wrist to much, which can cause damage to there wrist after a long period of time.

Other than accually playing with the student, it's best to get somewhat of a friendly relationship with them. It'll make communication between the two of you alot. Be sure to do your best with answering any questions they may have, and explaining things they can't quite understand.
#27
Quote by Copilot911
The one thing I love about my teacher is that he teaches me the tools in a non boring way. He is teaching my all the pentatonic scale shapes and the major and minor shapes, instead of just trying to teach me crappy songs .

Fixed
#28
Quote by caraluzzo
This dosn't sound right to me. You got asked to teach students at a local shop just from playing, right? If that were true, then how would they be sure that you knew music theory and other guitar related things you'd need to know to teach? Alot of teachers are certified, did they ask if you were? Sorry, just seams like bull to me.


No, he didn't ask questions about my theory knowledge, music reading ability until I called back with interest for the job. Didn't ask if I was certified, never even heard of that. I know it seems like bull, I would've thought so too until it happened.

Thanks for the post, very helpful
#29
My guitar teacher is really good.
Me and my mate have a half hour lesson with HER every thursday during school.If the people in the next slot don't show up she'll say 'do you wanna just keep going for the hour?'.
Anyway if they are a beginner teach them how how to get a good tone out of any guitar/amp.And things like teaching them how change a string and tune their guitar will also be beneficial.
For the slightly more adavanced obviously theory but more importantly how it all relates to each other.That's what really helps.
Other than that be really friendly and tell them plenty of helpful things like "if you sit like that when your playing it will eventually damage your back" (i get that one all the time).
Oh yeah,JAM!
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#30
^ That would be my ideal teacher

Anyway, from what I've seen. Don't be strict to keep with the planned program all the time. Be flexible and improvise to make your student happy from time to time won't hurt anybody. I hated my teacher because he was such an asshole who couldn't throw away his schedule book for one single second.
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


Last edited by hminh87 at Sep 11, 2008,
#31
BUMP

thought you guys might be curious, I've finished my second week of lessons and I think they're going very well. I've got a 50 year old guy who just started, been teaching him the most theory because he's very open to it and wants to understand it very badly for some reason. Next is a guy about 19 years old, been playing a few months only knows open chords, he wants to learn classic rock/blues which is right up my alley. Last is a 12 year old kid who just got his first guitar and wants to melt faces. He seems like a "guitar hero" beginner but has a lot of excitement, I think he'll end up pretty good.

Everyone has been coming back for more lessons so that's probably a good sign!
#32
my advice would be... mmm, well, I remember i went to my guitar teacher with a frien of mine at tha same time... just don''t let that happen, because it almost impossible that two different guys practice the same amount of time, so there's always gonna be someone that gets better faster, and then, if you lower the level to the one that is not very good, the other one will not learn nothin, and if you teach for the one who learnt faster, the other won't get any idea...


just one kid/guy/old one at time, please.
#33
There is a very easy way to teach guitar, and all you need is one teaching tool.

Your friend, the brick.


Here is how it works. Have your student do a scale, fingering exercise, anything you wish. If he messes up, (this part is key to the teaching process) take said brick, and throw it at the face of the student.

Rinse, wash, and repeat. Your student will be a virtuoso in no time.
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