#1
I picked up a washburn dime about 3 weeks ago. Last night the guitar was dropped on the top corner of one of its tails, and a large chunk of the top corner came off, and is only hanging on by the body binding. how can i fix this myself? i've accepted that there's going to be a huge crack wrapped around the body at this point. Glue and clamps? but what kind of glue, etc. I'm not familiar with this, so please any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

Derek
#2
probably wood glue?

or an apoxy maybe?
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#3
Araldite/epoxy should do the trick. I've used it on guitars before; lasts forever, practically.
#4
yeah thats what i was thinking. but was wondering what guitar manufacturers use to bond wood? also clamping? and for how long? just nervous cuz i pretty much have only one shot to fix it so i need to get it right
#5
Cuddrow, you've used it on bodies? unfortunately the piece thats broken off is the section of the body where i leverage my arm to use the whammy bar, so it needs to be reallllyyy tough
#7
Wood glue is stronger than wood when its dried.

Manufacturers use plain old wood glue.

Go get some Titebond from your local hardware store. Apply it to one side and spread it out thin with your fingertip. It should be wet but not sloshing around with tons of excess glue. (makes cleanup a pain)

Clamp it in place. It would be best to use at least two clamps that can reach the width of the guitar. If you have to clamp a curved surface, then you may need to cut something out to fit against the curve and provide a flat surface for the clamp. Many people will make an outline of the body and cut that into one side of a piece of wood. Make one for both sides, and then clamp it across with the body and broken piece wedged in between.

You might be able to get away with the wedges if your clamps have rubber feet and you can get a good angle on it.

Let it dry for several hours, overnight to be 100% sure.

Make sure you have everything prepared and attempt a dry run before applying any glue. Once the glue is on, you've got to move quickly. It sets up pretty well after a few minutes.

Use a moist paper towel to clean off the excess glue from the body and your hands. Wood glue is water soluble, so that works best.
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#8
Oh damn, I just realized what guitar shape you're talking about. Thats gonna be fun. You will need to work out a way to align it so the piece doesn't shift while drying. It will look like crap if you don't.

Some dowels would be nice... if you could measure them and locate them identically on both pieces. You get some 1/8" dowel and drill an 1/8" hole about 1/2" deep into either side of the exposed wood. Put at least two of them in there and when you put the thing together, you use two pieces of dowel that are slightly less than an inch long and slide them into the holes. When you clamp it now, the dowels won't allow anything to move. The joint will be tough as hell.
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#9
^ Yes, dowelling it is the way to go. It will turn out stronger than before it broke!
#10
Sorry about a late reply, but yeah, sort of. I've used it for straplocks several times, and they are screwed directly into the wood. I don't think you'll find a stronger glue for this sort of thing, but I could be wrong.
#11
Quote by cedricsmods
^ Yes, dowelling it is the way to go. It will turn out stronger than before it broke!



no, it wont. dowelling decreases original gluing surface, making it a weaker joint. the dowell wood you add will not increase the strength either. dowells only came about because old table makers needed to keep things in place when they glued up.
#12
As a furniture maker myself, I have to disagree. It's similar to laminating different grain orientations together, you're adding an additional strong axis.
#13
Quote by LP Addict
no, it wont. dowelling decreases original gluing surface, making it a weaker joint. the dowell wood you add will not increase the strength either. dowells only came about because old table makers needed to keep things in place when they glued up.



Just caught this now, sorry for the really late reply.


Please, instead of disregarding the dowelling method as a bad idea, explain another method that will put this guitar back together correctly without gluing in the wrong place.
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