#2
erm, different people have different tastes, figure it out yourself. btw thats an E sus 2 (maybe sus 4, either way its a sus)
#3
no it's not it's a Dmaj7/A chord, and that's not in relation to the capo, in relation to the capo it's a Cmaj7/G chord. basically it's a 2nd inversion of the the maj7 chord. I'm gonna talk about all the chords in relation to the capo so you don't get confused, that is a Cmaj7/G chord, so any chord in the key of C will work. Here's a list of 7th chords in the key of C.

Cmaj7
Dm7
Em7
Fmaj7
G7
Am7
Bb5m7
and back to Cmaj7

basically you can make any chord using notes from the C major scale with that chord, (although since i never think of chords in realtion to the capo, remember that the song is actually in D major, it will help out any bassist a whole lot.) Later peeps....
#4
ps. the notes of the c major scale are C D E F G A B C, if you didn't know that,
#6
Quote by fade177

Dm7
Em7
Fmaj7
G7
Am7
Bb5m7
and back to Cmaj7



could you tell me where to play these chords in relation to the capo?
cuz i get confused when I look the chords uP
#7
in relation to the capo

if your chord is 332000

then Dm is xx0231
Em is 022000
F is 133211
G is 320033
Am is x02210
and Bb5 would be 789777 but more than likely you will never use this chord.

To be honest, your chord progression will more than likely involve the F and G chords and then your choice between the Dm or Am, the most common chord progressions use those particular chords of scale. You might use the Em as a transition chord in your piece, the G chord will always want to go back to the C, and that's about all the help i can give you. Look up different chord voicings and experiment. That's what theory is about - here are the rules, break them where you see fit....