#1
For some reason, my main web browser disappeared, and on this web browser, I can't send emails. I need to switch computers in order to be able to send my article., so I'm going to post my article here, and simply copy paste it once I'm on the other computer. It's a nice little article about the local wildlife refuge. You guys can lock this forum in like 30 minutes, or you guys could critique my writing skills.

Île Saint-Bernad - The Last hint of nature?


Although founded in 1987 as a protected area for local fauna and flora, the origins of Île Saint-Bernard begin much before this. When Châteauguay was purchased by early colonial nuns known as the "Soeurs Grises" in 1765, they built a convent on an island, know known as L'Île des Soeurs. Officially proclaimed as a protected area in 1987, the island is almost a look into the Quebec of yesteryear, when the province was not yet industrialized, and the area was covered in millions upon millions of acres of wildlife. In 2006, an effort was put forth by the the city of Châteauguay to raise awareness to our local fauna and flora. The Refuge Marguerite D'Youville (named after the head of the Soeurs Grises in charge of the Châteuaguay purchase) built a pavilion serving as a cafe and information booth. The pavilion, dubbed as "Le Pavillon de L'Île" also rents equipment for a number of activities spanning all four seasons. Considered a great success, the Refugee welcomed over 35000 visitors during the 2006-2007 season.

The Island, now with over 8 km of trails, including several beaches, observation points and picnic areas, is home to over 210 species of birds and countless types of flora, unique to the area. Although ran by the city, this wildlife refugee is largely a community effort. Each year, over fifty volunteers help to clean up the park, and help make it a safe place for the native animals, as well as an area that the whole city can be proud of. In 2007, the first year a island wide clean was put in effect, a forty cubic yard container was filled in mere hours. Also relatively new is the Théatre Quatre-Quarts where many local and touring plays perform every year.

As we move even further into the new Millennium, we see less and less green areas and more and more wildlife disappearing. With new surging interest in the Île Saint-Bernard and the Refuge Marguerite D'Youville, it is a breath of fresh that there is hope that the future will be brighter for the greenspaces of the area, and that not all values are lost in the industrial boom we are all experiencing.

I didn't have time to go and take pictures since me and Alex couldn't work out a time to work together. This is all the info that I could find. I could probably take pictures on saturday or sunday if an extension is given. But ths is probably my last article, since I'm switching out of journalism since my after school schedule is way too packed to be able to commit myslef 100% in writting articles. It was alot of fun writting for the past year
Thanks,
Stephen
#3
Thanks, I sent the article. You guys can delete this thread or whatever.
Any imput on the article?