#1
i have my band together and everything a guitarist bassist drummer and me as singer but we have a problem at practice.... we can't stay together we all start at the right times but very quickly lose the timing we even tried a song where we coudn't get playing together right from the start...... Help and suggestions?
#2
Let the vocalis count you in.
Vamp (repeat) the first chord/riff with guitar, drums and bass.
Then let the singer jump in; as soon as he jumps in, act as that chord/riff he chose is the first one in the song.

Play the guitar in sync with the vocalist and drums. The bass will probably follow by the guitars.

Like today we did a cover of Losing My Religion with 2 guitars, a drummer, bassist and vocalist.
Me, the other guitarist, drummer and bassist were counted in by the vocalist.
We would repeat the same chord which was an Am, the drummer would repeat the rudiment and the bass would play the same note over and over. Then after 4 bars or so, the vocalist jumped in (in time, he didnt just randomly jump in in the middle of us strumming a Am bar). Then because we know the song so well, if me or the bassist lost where we were, for example, we could jump right back in because we knew where we would be because of the vocals, and the drums helped us keep the beat and rhythm.

That how I do it.
#4
Quote by drewfromutah
Make sure you're all following the drums, not the singer. If everyone stays with the drums and doesn't try to keep up with the singer, you'll be fine.


i don't get it (gosh I sound like a noob)

If we lost each other how would we know where the drum is?
#5
Quote by speedy1330
i don't get it (gosh I sound like a noob)

If we lost each other how would we know where the drum is?

Because the drums are what the rest of you should all be following.
Think of the drums as a big metronome. Your drummer defines the timing and the rest of you follow it, which is why you normaly get the drummer to count songs in.

The vocals are useful to use as cues and remind you of just where you are in the song.

Let's take a basic song formula of verse, chorus, verse, chorus, solo, verse, chorus, end. (sometimes, when working on a song that you are not familiar with, it can be useful to actualy write the song's formula down on a big board and put it up somewhere where you can all see it clearly, especialy if it's a more complex formula than the basic repetative one that I've used for an example, just until you've all got used to it)
Let's also say for the sake of argument that each verse comprises of four lines and that the solo is exactly the same length as a verse and played over the same tune or riff as the verse.

The drummer will count you in and you all start together following the drummer's beat for your own timings. (because you are all following the same drummer, then you should all be playing to the same timing)
The singer will then sing the first verse and when he reaches the end of the fourth line, you should all know that it's time to play the chorus, but it's because you are all following the same beat that the drummer is laying down that you can all change to the chorus at exactly the same time.
For the solo, all you need to know is the last few words of the second chorus. When you hear those particular words, that is your cue that it's time for the solo to begin.
Now while the solo is playing, imagine that the singer is still singing the verse, hum it to yourself if you wish. Where the singer will normaly end the verse, that's the end of the solo and the next verse begins.
Of course, you don't all need to be humming the verses to yourself, all you really need is the singer doing this while the rest of you concentrate on following the drums, and because the solo and verse are the same tune, he can simply start singing when it's time to do the third verse and the rest of you can take your cue from that.
After he's sung another four lines, (one verse) it's time for the (final) chorus again.

Keep doing this and eventualy you'll all develop a feel for it and will no longer need to concentrate anywhere near as much on what you are all doing, it will come naturaly to you.


Many people count as they are playing.
Let's take a well known song chosen at random, 'Johnny B Goode' by Chuck Berry, and look at the first line of it's first verse. (that's all we need to look at because each line has exactly the same timing)

Down in Louisiana close to New Orleans
1............2.......3.....4...........1..........2.........3.........4


Ignore the words, let's look at the actual structure of the line.

Dum de dum de dum de dum de dum de dum
1...........2..........3..........4..........1.........2.........3.........4


See? The song is played 8 beats to a line, that works out at 2 sylables to each beat with the last sylable of the last word being stretched over 2 sylables.
Downin, Lousi, ana, closeto, NewOr, leans
1...........2........3......4...........1.........2.........3.........4

So why the '3........4' at the end of the line? That's the singers breathing space. Without that little gap of two beats in the singing, he'll soon run out of air and pass out.

Now let's look at it with a very basic drum beat.

Downin,...Lousi,.......ana,.........closeto,....NewOr,.....leans
Dum de....dum de....dum de....dum, de....dum de.....dum
1..............2..............3..............4...............1...............2............3..............4
bum..........tit............bumbum...tit..............bum..........tit...........bumbum....tit

Johhny B. Goode has six lines per verse and eight beats per line
So to someone just counting and playing the appropriate chords, it'll look something like this.

A 1234,1234.
A 1234,1234
D 1234,1234
A 1234,1234
E 1234,1234
A 1234,1234

I've tried my best to explain it in very basic laymans terms for you. I've never learned to read music or really studied music theory that much either, I just developed a natural feel for it over time, so it isn't really that easy for me to explain as it's been that long since I've had to actualy think about any of this, but I hope it helps in some way.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Sep 15, 2008,
#7
Quote by speedy1330
it did help..... alot

thanks

Anytime speedy.

Let us know if you manage to impliment any of this with your band and if it improves matters in any way.
#9
The drummer should lead and the bassist and guitarist should follow their beat and the singer should then listen to the guitar.