#1
guys started practicing with my band about mont or two ago... and it/s going pretty well... but lately i've starteed getting that feedback... and i dono how to controll it or how to make it to appear... any whelp...

everything or anything about feedback would be aprecioated
#2
If your amp is loud and your gain is high. You'll get feedback. Try not standing directly in front of your amp. Turn your gain down just a little bit. If that doesnt suit your taste then buy a noise gate. Thats what i did. I got the boss ns-2. No more feed back for me. Although i hear there are better noise gates out there than the boss. Maby someone else has some better info than me.
#3
Get a noise gate/noise suppressor. If you play with anything above moderate gain, you're going to need one. Otherwise, you'll have to drop the gain a tad, inch the volume knob on your axe down to 8ish, and take the cut in drive.
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#5
^ Yeah, a noise gate is perfect then! Have it on when you dont want feedback, and flick the off switch when you do want feedback.
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#6
Quote by vigenharutyunya
guys i aint tring to get rid of it... i'm triing to get it... lol
to controll it ... make it appear whenever i want... it's so freaking awesome


Ahhh... Kids these days. It takes years of intense training to master feedback!

Just kidding a noise gate is good. Just turn it off when you want feedback

EDIT: damn beaten to it
#7
Walk over to the amp and hold the guitar up to the speaker. Voila!

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#8
you need your amp loud, and you have to get close to it, experiment to find a perfect spot... when the note you're fretting starts feedbacking, use slight vibrato to control it and prevent it from getting too loud. also, you can use volume knob to control it, or try to move from the spot you're getting feedback at...
EDIT: to checker, about your sig, thanks man, same to you...
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Last edited by 666_Belial at Sep 13, 2008,
#9
There are two different types of feedback, and its all very dependent on the amp that you have, you'll need a tube amp, and you'll need to crank it up very loud.

There is feedback that is associated with noise, that is bad, sounds bad and is unusable.

Then there is the desirable type of feedback.

I know the type of feedback that you're talking about, the kind where you play a note and the note decays into a harmonically even feedback that basically makes your note sustain indefinitely, or produce feedback that is rich with harmonic overtones.

Getting this takes practice and is very dependent on the amp that you have. Turn your amp up very loud (not the gain, the master volume), play a high note, give it a vibrato and as it decays, you should have the note decay into feedback. It has nothing to do with gain, its just one of the qualities of a cranked tube amp.

I believe this is the type of effect you're going for?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBMEaX5PcH0

(Watch the entire video, the guy uses feedback all throughout until the end)
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 13, 2008,
#10
you definitely need a decent amount of volume, and you should be close to the amp. some gain helps too.
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#11
Quote by al112987
There are two different types of feedback, and its all very dependent on the amp that you have, you'll need a tube amp, and you'll need to crank it up very loud.

no need for a tube amp, it may sound nicer, but you can get it with any decent amp if you try enough... at least i managed it on some solid state that's 20 or 30 years old and a distortion pedal, i can get as much sustain as i want if find the right position...
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#12
Quote by 666_Belial
you need your amp loud, and you have to get close to it, experiment to find a perfect spot... when the note you're fretting starts feedbacking, use slight vibrato to control it and prevent it from getting too loud. also, you can use volume knob to control it, or try to move from the spot you're getting feedback at...
EDIT: to checker, about your sig, thanks man, same to you...


Yeah I love doing this. I was using my volume knob to control it for nice effects during fades in the guitar. Works great handing off to a drum solo lol.

Quote by al112987
There are two different types of feedback, and its all very dependent on the amp that you have, you'll need a tube amp, and you'll need to crank it up very loud.

There is feedback that is associated with noise, that is bad, sounds bad and is unusable.

Then there is the desirable type of feedback.

I know the type of feedback that you're talking about, the kind where you play a note and the note decays into a harmonically even feedback that basically makes your note sustain indefinitely, or produce feedback that is rich with harmonic overtones.

Getting this takes practice and is very dependent on the amp that you have. Turn your amp up very loud (not the gain, the master volume), play a high note, give it a vibrato and as it decays, you should have the note decay into feedback. It has nothing to do with gain, its just one of the qualities of a cranked tube amp.


Sorry but it's not only a tube amp quality. My Ibanez TBX150H does this and it's 120w of solid state.
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