#1
So I have started to run about 5 miles a day to lose a little extra body fat and just be in better shape in general. I have also started eating healthier and doing core workouts such as sit ups, planks, push-ups, etc. with the hope that some day I may have visible abs. I'm not fat now, but I definitely have to much fat to see some abbage.

HERE COMES THE DILLEMA:

I recently read some info that mentioned running long distance is catabolic (it burns muscle and fat) and that it is not recommended if you want to bulk up. I was not sure whether this was just bad for trying to get huge muscles, or if it also was detrimental for those people trying to get lean such as me. If its that much of a problem, I'm going to start doing sprint running instead, so does anyone have any knowledge about this?
#2
little man syndrome? unless you wanna end up like those ginormous, tiny-headed weight lifters/ body builders in the olympics, you don't need huge muscles. If you're running, but still working out your muscles, the workouts should overpower/contradict the muscle cells being burned while running. But, i would suggest the body building thread for this.
#3
i could lose a few pounds too. but i have no idea. i actually thought this thread was about smoking weed haha.but yeah. exercise advice. i could use some of that.
#4
This belongs in the bodybuilding/nutrition thread. Remember six packs are made in the kitchen, most dietitians and exercise experts say that gaining muscle and losing body fat is 90% diet and 10% excersise.
I'm the new king
I taste the queen
In here we are all anemic
In here, anemic and sweet
#5
most of us could. imma start running some more too... i guess i'm in the same position as the guy who made this thread o.O
#6
If you make sure to increase your protein intake, you will build muscle, no doubt about that.
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
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i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

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#7
Quote by Shirate
If you make sure to increase your protein intake, you will build muscle, no doubt about that.

+1

Try to cut sugar out of your diet almost completely, with some fat and carbohydrates remaining. I've now stopped doing all exercise completely and i've never felt/looked better because I'm so strict about my diet.
I'm the new king
I taste the queen
In here we are all anemic
In here, anemic and sweet
#8
Quote by Broken Lungs
+1

Try to cut sugar out of your diet almost completely, with some fat and carbohydrates remaining. I've now stopped doing all exercise completely and i've never felt/looked better because I'm so strict about my diet.


So more meat, less potatoes, and no more King Cones?

Also, what about sweet potatoes and brown rice?

And also, sorry about not putting it in the bodybuilding thread, I wasn't aware of it. Guess I should've used the search bar.
#9
Quote by Broken Lungs
This belongs in the bodybuilding/nutrition thread. Remember six packs are made in the kitchen, most dietitians and exercise experts say that gaining muscle and losing body fat is 90% diet and 10% excersise.


Actually, the ab part depends on what you consist of. If you're scrawny and have little to work with, it doesn't matter what you eat. It is true for the most part; most people have good abs, they're just hidden under the extra lard.

As for the OP, if you're just trying to get into better shape and not become the next Ronnie Coleman ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYov15S3RFU ), I don't think you need to concern yourself with catabolic reactions just yet

I think you should kind of try to divide exercising though. No use running everyday, and no use doing the same stuff everyday. Run more on some days, and do more on some days. Muscles recover better, and you gain more through that. As for diet, perhaps good old fashioned commonsense will be enough. Less sugar, less fat, less carbs and more protein. Don't overdo it though. Plenty of good advice on the internet, do something that's sustainable and something you don't mind. No use gargling down raw egg, eating chicken and drinking skimmed goddamn milk everyday since it's just going to make you say "fuk it".
#10
Quote by asmeister
Actually, the ab part depends on what you consist of. If you're scrawny and have little to work with, it doesn't matter what you eat. It is true for the most part; most people have good abs, they're just hidden under the extra lard.

As for the OP, if you're just trying to get into better shape and not become the next Ronnie Coleman ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYov15S3RFU ), I don't think you need to concern yourself with catabolic reactions just yet

I think you should kind of try to divide exercising though. No use running everyday, and no use doing the same stuff everyday. Run more on some days, and do more on some days. Muscles recover better, and you gain more through that. As for diet, perhaps good old fashioned commonsense will be enough. Less sugar, less fat, less carbs and more protein. Don't overdo it though. Plenty of good advice on the internet, do something that's sustainable and something you don't mind. No use gargling down raw egg, eating chicken and drinking skimmed goddamn milk everyday since it's just going to make you say "fuk it".


Haha, yeah, I can feel some nice abs down there, its just that they are under maybe a half inch of fat near the bottom of my belly.

I do change how far I run from day to day, between 2-6 miles.
#11
Quote by iamnotrabid
So more meat, less potatoes, and no more King Cones?

Also, what about sweet potatoes and brown rice?

And also, sorry about not putting it in the bodybuilding thread, I wasn't aware of it. Guess I should've used the search bar.

Yeah, like the guy above me said, with a balanced diet and balanced exercise you can achieve results without sacrificing good food or your social life. Try to cut back on fat sugar and carbs, and try to increase your protien intake.

On the internet there is alot of good advice, but there's also alot of extremely unrealistic advice, don't bother with counting you're calorie intake or writting out massive meal plans and set your watch to exactly what time you will eat your next meal, most of that advise is for competative body builders, as well as people with metabolism defects etc.

Balance is the key.
I'm the new king
I taste the queen
In here we are all anemic
In here, anemic and sweet