#1
Ok, so I'm covering some basic things here, so far everything is going great, but something has got me a tiny bit confused.

When you want to find a chord, you find it by using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th from it's major scale; so C would be CEG, I think. What has me confused is how you make a chord out of three notes, where does each note go?

I'm applying this to all chords, not just C.
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#2
Quote by Holy.
Ok, so I'm covering some basic things here, so far everything is going great, but something has got me a tiny bit confused.

When you want to find a chord, you find it by using the 1st, 3rd, and 5th from it's major scale; so C would be CEG, I think. What has me confused is how you make a chord out of three notes, where does each note go?

I'm applying this to all chords, not just C.


Not sure what you mean by "where does each note go."
#3
Ah... On average, chords would out with the root note being the lowest one in the chord, followed by the 3rd, and last the fifth.


-x-
-x-
-x-
-2- (5th)
-4- (3rd)
-5- (R)


In this case it would be C-E-G. However, it can be hard to play those notes in that order on guitar therefore they need to be rearranged.


-x-
-x-
-6- (octave of 3rd)
-7- (octave or root)
-7- (5th)
-5- (R)


or


-5- (R)
-5- (5th)
-6- (3rd)
-x-
-x-
-x-


That leads us to "voicings." What this means is the way in which the notes are placed, whether it's C-E-G, G-E-C, or C-G-C-E, etc... It's still the same chord but with a different feel/sound.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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Last edited by evening_crow at Sep 12, 2008,
#4
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Not sure what you mean by "where does each note go."

For example, when I get the notes C,E, and G, how would I know which string each note goes in. And how do I know if a string is open, etc.

I know I explained it in a confusing way, but hopefully someone understands me.
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#5
yeh you build the chord from the scale but you dont just use the one box shape to create the chord. ie you dont take the C (3rd fret, 5th string) then look at the major scale and take the third note from the same string (E, 7th fret, 5th string). you take the E from the 4th string 2nd fret, then of course the G (open 3rd string) - 3 note chord. to fill it out obv you take the C 2nd string 1st fret and open E 1st string.

you wouldnt use the E at the open position 6th string or the G 6th string either as they would be dominate the C as they are more bassier.

is that what your Q is getting at?! you need to learn the shapes of the chords, much easier than simply applying the notes, although you should have knowledge of how the chords fit together.

go to GOSK for shapes, just google it.
#6
Quote by evening_crow
Ah... On average chords will start out with the root note being the lowest one in the chord, followed by the 3rd, and last the fifth. In this case it would be C-E-G. However, it can be hard to play those notes in that order on guitar therefore they need to be rearranged. That leads us to "voicings." What this means is the way in which the notes are placed, whether it's C-E-G, G-E-C, or E-C-G, etc... It's still the same chord but with a different feel/sound.


It should also be mentioned that inverting a chord may alter its function in some way, or distort the stability of the chord (or even turn it into a different chord). This isn't a bad thing (in fact, it's tremendously useful), but it's something to be aware of.
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#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
It should also be mentioned that inverting a chord may alter its function in some way, or distort the stability of the chord (or even turn it into a different chord). This isn't a bad thing (in fact, it's tremendously useful), but it's something to be aware of.

I'm aware of that but i wasn't sure how to describe it, hence why i said that it'll create a "different feel/sound."

EDIT: i'm editing my first post to make it a bit more useful.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#8
The CEG is called a major triad. play those three notes together in any position and you have a major chord.
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#9
Quote by Holy.
For example, when I get the notes C,E, and G, how would I know which string each note goes in. And how do I know if a string is open, etc.

I know I explained it in a confusing way, but hopefully someone understands me.


The notes CEG, anywhere on the fretboard, are a C major chord. Play it however you want.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
So in the C chord, why is their a C on the first fret of the second string, when there is a C on the 5th fret?

I'm sorry I just don't get it.
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#11
Quote by Holy.
So in the C chord, why is their a C on the first fret of the second string, when there is a C on the 5th fret?

I'm sorry I just don't get it.


What? Elaborate.
You can play the notes wherever you want.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Holy.
So in the C chord, why is their a C on the first fret of the second string, when there is a C on the 5th fret?

I'm sorry I just don't get it.


Because there can be more than one of any note within a given chord.

There's no hard and fast rule for deciding how to play a chord. Use the shape that you like best.
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#13
the chord will sound fuller as you have C and E notes an octave (or more) above the C and E notes on the 3rd and 4th string - still a major triad as you have just the three notes of C E G.

its just how its done, you can play the 3note version if you like, you'll get a more focused sound, 3 note chords are good if finger picking as you have better control over the dynamics. plus good for beginners who struggle to finger across all the strings.

when strumming it would be rare to simply play three strings, you'd use all 6 or 5. as i said check out GOSK for chord shapes or do a search for lessons on here there would be heaps.

play the 3 note version then strum the 5 note version, it'll be easier to strum and it will sound better.
#14
I guess I kind of get it now, thanks.

Sorry for the mixups though, I'm trying to understand theory a little better on guitar so confusion really strikes me here and there.
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