#1
What should I play if someone is soloing in Em for example and telling me to back him up? Should I play chords Em, Am and Bm (I, IV and V)? Or should I play different notes in the scale just on the lower strings? What would sound good?
My improvisation in the band audition determines, if I get the place or not.
Last edited by Amarant at Sep 13, 2008,
#2
Best thing to do is stick with playing some chords. If its to determine if you get a place or not do some rock poses or a power slide
#3
wow that is the worst test ever. What type of band is it? if its a straight old school blues band than it should all be about the 145, but if you guys are a little jazzier than i would throw in a bunch of chordal changes.
i enjoy head
#4
haha i bet it's just a rock, metal group isnt it.. anyway, myself and the other guitarist both have lead and rhythm parts, so when he's doing a high sweeps or melodies, here's what i do:
work out a pattern with the drummer, if it's like metal music... (you probably should have specified) figure a rhythm that accents the solo with drums, cant go wrong man. the band will have to trust you
#5
Don't know, what it exactly is. It sounds oldschool. Soft, with no distortion nor power chords, so 145 should do it, I guess.
#6
Jazzcore is right, that test is absurd. The lead should be following the rhythm, not vice versa. Even in jazz, where improvisation in the rhythm section is common, there's still an enormous amount of communication between the two parts, and no one is going to be told simply to "play something in Em".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Jazzcore is right, that test is absurd. The lead should be following the rhythm, not vice versa. Even in jazz, where improvisation in the rhythm section is common, there's still an enormous amount of communication between the two parts, and no one is going to be told simply to "play something in Em".

this.
that band is not woth joining if thats their audition.
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#8
Listen to the soloist, communicate. Do some call and response. If he plays a catchy little rhythm, recreate it with chords.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
The lead should be following the rhythm, not vice versa.
Quoted for emphasis.


If you're told to play in Em, play what you want in Em, though the more common choice of chord would B7, not Bm. If your soloist is being a vague jackass, he can follow your rhythm.
#10
If he's just doing Em Pentatonic wanking, you can probably just do 1-2 chord vamp (not sure if I'm using that term correctly) mixing notes from E major and E minor. Maybe something implying E7#9.
#11
Quote by werty22
If he's just doing Em Pentatonic wanking, you can probably just do 1-2 chord vamp (not sure if I'm using that term correctly) mixing notes from E major and E minor. Maybe something implying E7#9.


E7#9 is far and away different than Em.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Jazzcore is right, that test is absurd. The lead should be following the rhythm, not vice versa. Even in jazz, where improvisation in the rhythm section is common, there's still an enormous amount of communication between the two parts, and no one is going to be told simply to "play something in Em".

+1.

Even this thread title implies to me that you and/or the band are/is approaching this whole thing wrong. You should think about it as "what solo can I put over this rhythm" instead of "what can I play under the solo". Never forget that the rhythm is the foundation and it has to be rock solid.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
E7#9 is far and away different than Em.

I realize that. I don't feel like bothering to explain why I used that as an example.
#14
If you're not going to explain why you said something odd that you think makes sense, don't make the odd comment.

Please delete your posts from this thread.
#15
Fine, I'll explain. I didn't feel like it last night because I was about to go to sleep.

A lot of people just play random vaguely bluesy solos in Em pentatonic. In my experience, the two types of players that seem to overuse Em pentatonic most are Jimi Hendrix fans and Metallica fans.

E7#9 implies the use of both a minor third and a major third, which is a common characteristic of blues. It is also often called the "Hendrix chord." Jimi fans (in my experience) seem to use it a lot.

I could have just as easily suggested he play a generic thrash metal riff. But for some reason I got the impression that the band he was auditioning for was more classic-rock-oriented than metal. I don't know why I thought that because I don't really have any idea what kind of band it is.
#16
Quote by werty22
Fine, I'll explain. I didn't feel like it last night because I was about to go to sleep.

A lot of people just play random vaguely bluesy solos in Em pentatonic. In my experience, the two types of players that seem to overuse Em pentatonic most are Jimi Hendrix fans and Metallica fans.

E7#9 implies the use of both a minor third and a major third, which is a common characteristic of blues. It is also often called the "Hendrix chord." Jimi fans (in my experience) seem to use it a lot.

I could have just as easily suggested he play a generic thrash metal riff. But for some reason I got the impression that the band he was auditioning for was more classic-rock-oriented than metal. I don't know why I thought that because I don't really have any idea what kind of band it is.


E7#9 is an altered dominant chord. In blues, where progressions constructed entirely of dominant chords are common, it would be common to play the minor pentatonic over all of them (which implies an altered scale). This is not diatonic and sounds far different than "minor". It is not something you would do (especially in popular music) without the knowledge of the person who is soloing over you.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.