#1
First, I know it's pathetic, but I've been playing for 2 years, know a fair amount of theory. However, I just started ear training today using www.musictheory.net and have encountered a problem.

I've started with just unison, perfect fourths and perfect fifths. Now, I am only getting about 75% with this, and am definatly not pleased.

Can anyone give me any advice or methods that will help my ear training?

Thanks for any help.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#2
Quote by The_Sophist
First, I know it's pathetic, but I've been playing for 2 years, know a fair amount of theory. However, I just started ear training today using www.musictheory.net and have encountered a problem.

I've started with just unison, perfect fourths and perfect fifths. Now, I am only getting about 75% with this, and am definatly not pleased.

Can anyone give me any advice or methods that will help my ear training?

Thanks for any help.


Practice!

No, I know you know that. I also imagine that you are familiar with the cliche (but useful) examples of "Here Comes the Bride" for a perfect 4th, and the "Star Wars" theme, for perfect fifths.

I imagine that you aren't screwing up the unisons, so you might even want to drop that option to concentrate on 4ths and 5ths. Now, these intervals aren't too easy next to each other; inversions in general are difficult, and these are the closest inversions. My ear training teacher tried to get us used to hearing the missing third inside of a fifth: if the third won't fit, the interval is a 4th. This may or may not help you.

I guess what you can do is make sure everything is as simplified as possible. For starters, limit the direction to up, and the play mode to melodic, and not harmonic, intervals. This will mimic the "Here Comes the Bride" and "Star Wars" intervals, so you can more easily relate the two. As you improve, you can try changing the direction to down, then up and down, and add harmonic intervals.


I'm sorry if this isn't a ton of help to you, but hopefully just continuing to work through the intervals gradually will help you improve.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#3
That was actually quite a bit of help, though out of it came another question. If I use "Here comes the bride" and "star wars" to practise, will I become dependent on them in the long run?

Edit : Also, what intervals should I be starting with?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
Last edited by The_Sophist at Sep 13, 2008,
#4
download the trial of this!! http://www.earmaster.com/

If you use simple tunes like here comes the bride to recognize intervals it won't become a crutch later. Its basically a starting point to hear the intervals, once you really "get" them you will understand them on a more instinctual level.
#5
Although, of course, it is important to also practice recognition of the descending (and harmonic) intervals as well.

I did spend significantly more time on ascending intervals when I started ear training, thinking that I would also have a firm grasp on descending intervals... but I didn't. So, just be sure to commit time to those, as well.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#6
Quote by psychodelia
Although, of course, it is important to also practice recognition of the descending (and harmonic) intervals as well.

I did spend significantly more time on ascending intervals when I started ear training, thinking that I would also have a firm grasp on descending intervals... but I didn't. So, just be sure to commit time to those, as well.


Definitely true.
#7
This sounds like a lot, how long do you think it should take to be able to recognize any interval automatically if I were to practise say, 20 minutes a day?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
if i were u, i'd try starting out from the bottom. start with the 2nds (min and maj). lear to recognise them going up and down. after that go onto the next two, which are the 3rds (min maj). then be able to recognise them. u will be able to link them to songs as you progress, or even feelings that you get when you hear them. I know that I can tell something is sharp or flat by the way I actually feel my ear drum/canal slightly twitch.

i recommend u look into a program called auralia. i've never used or heard of the program u speak of, but auralia is amazing.
#9
you should totally start like good-ear.com progresses.
unison - major 3rd - perfect fifth - octave
octave may sound easy, but it can be confused sometimes.

then unison - maj 2nd - maj 3rd - perf fourth and fifth - major sixth - major seventh - octave

and finally the rest.
but don't forget to train both ascending and descending intervals! the brain takes them as completely different things.
#10
why are you asking us mr sophist, if we do not exist?
BE HAPPY

Quote by ajmasterjaydude
so this kid at my school microwaved brussel sprouts for lunch, and when he was about to eat them one of them exploded on his face and burned him. i like turtles


in a thread about malmsteen^
#11
lol, Keep each threads topic within the thread please.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#12
I have another question is someone would be so kinda as to help me.

On the musictheory.net ear training, they change the root for every interval. Now on another site, goodear.com or something like that the root note is static.

On musictheory.net I'm getting a pitiful 60% of the basic notes correct, and on goodear.com I am getting maybe 90% of the intervals right.

I am a complete beginner ear trainer.

Which way would benefit me more, using musictheory.net or goodear.com?

Thanks for any help.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#13
well since the question seems to still be out there, i would go with the musictheory.net, roots change man, you gotta learn these things like they will be, it takes time but ive gotten pretty okay at it and i learned with the moving roots.

its just realistic ya know?

EDIT: i totally got sophist confused with solopsist. . . therefore my original joke was retarded
BE HAPPY

Quote by ajmasterjaydude
so this kid at my school microwaved brussel sprouts for lunch, and when he was about to eat them one of them exploded on his face and burned him. i like turtles


in a thread about malmsteen^