#1
So I play acoustic guitar but my (lets say) guitars were limited. My true desire is to play electric... however I know absolutely nothing about it. So I have a some questions that I need to ask and I would really appreciate it if you'd answer them:

1. Let's just say I get a Gibson Les Paul or something. Do I need to get a specific amp too? Are all guitar amps the same? Can you plug a mic into one? Are there amps for mic's?

2. What are pickups? I always here "yeah those are great pickups"... what?

3. What's distortion? And all of those other words that go with it? Reverb?

4. What are tubes?

Yeah, that's all I can think of on the spot... I'd be awesome if you'd answered those for me. Thanks in advance. Oh, also: Are there any other things you'd like to tell me that a noob wouldn't know?
#2
Quote by larrytheguitar
So I play acoustic guitar but my (lets say) guitars were limited. My true desire is to play electric... however I know absolutely nothing about it. So I have a some questions that I need to ask and I would really appreciate it if you'd answer them:

1. Let's just say I get a Gibson Les Paul or something. Do I need to get a specific amp too? Are all guitar amps the same? Can you plug a mic into one? Are there amps for mic's?

2. What are pickups? I always here "yeah those are great pickups"... what?

3. What's distortion? And all of those other words that go with it? Reverb?

4. What are tubes?

Yeah, that's all I can think of on the spot... I'd be awesome if you'd answered those for me. Thanks in advance. Oh, also: Are there any other things you'd like to tell me that a noob wouldn't know?


1. No amp specifically, just one for electric guitar. No, they are not the same. No, you cannot plug a mic in it. Mics on acoustics are like amplifiers for electrics.

2. The little bars on the scratch plate, between the bridge and the neck.

3. Distortion, the opposite of clean. Think of most rock bands. The loud fuzz sound that you hear is distortion. Reverb is an effect. It makes the sound more of an echo as if playing in a cave.
#3
Quote by metallinutter
1. No amp specifically, just one for electric guitar. No, they are not the same. No, you cannot plug a mic in it. Mics on acoustics are like amplifiers for electrics.

Actually, a mic pointed at an acoustic is more like the pickups on an electric. The mic still needs amplification by a PA; it just detects what the guitar is doing.

Read the stickies, TS.
#4
any guitar works with any amp,
mics through amps aren't great get a PA(public address system)
pickups are the things below the strings that take the sound and put it in the amp
there are 2 kinds single coils(stratocasters) & humbuckers(les pauls)
2 kinds of amps tube and solid state, solid state generally sucks, unless your playing high distortion stuff

distortion & reverb are effects
distortion is basically what seperates an electrics sound from a acoustics sound
Quote by guitardude34875
be the music, not the scene
#7
you dont need advice you need jesus. everybody knows what an acoustic sounds like. or a saxaphone or a piano or a clarinet or an oboe or whatever. but what does an electric guitar sound like? buddy holly played an electric guitar. so did jimi hendrix and james hetfield and buckethead and jimy page. there is a huge amount of possibilities on electric guitar and it would take a book to anwser your question. first off the amp is more important to a degree than the guitar for the overall sound. pickups have the biggest effect on sound as far as the guitar is concerned but wood type plays a significant transient role. you have to listen to them to get an idea of the differences and its not just output and frequency response but harmonics and balance and many other things. tubes basically are what you need to have in your amp no matter what. a amp without tubes is like a guitar without wood. and distortion and all other effects for that matter are what make an electric guitar more than just an acoustic guitar simulator. if you dont know what i mean on any of that you need to find out through any recources you can find to get the big picture.
#8
1. Each guitar does not need a specific amp to go with it. Just whatever sounds good to you. Once you know which guitar you are going to get, try it through various different amps and decide which sounds best to you. Mics are usually plugged into a P.A., rather than the amp, but if you did want to plug the mic into the amp, a few amps have XLR (mic cables are called XLR cables) inputs on them, or you could just run it through a mixer and make the output a 1/4 inch cable.

2. Pickups are the little bar-like things on the body that have little magnets on them. Basically, the magnets pick up the vibrations from the strings, and convert them from acoustic to electric energy. Then, the electric energy goes through your cable to the amp, which modifies that electric energy (makes it louder, EQ's it, etc.), and then converts it back into acoustic energy that people can here. Different pickups will sound different, and good quality pickups tend to have a higher output level than crappy ones.

3. Distortion is what makes the guitar sound all rockish and heavy. Like you know how if you hear a crappy recording or someone speaking really loudly into a microphone it will sound all nasty and over-modulated. That is essentially what guitar distortion is, just more precise, and deliberate. Reverb, chorus, delay, etc. are all just different effects that will make your guitar sound different.

4. Tubes are these things (they're kinda like lightbulb fuses) that are in some amps. You see, there are three basic types of amps: tube, solid state, and hybrid. Tubes have tubes in them, solid states don't, and hybrids are kinda in between. Which type you want depends on the kind of sound you are looking for. If you get a tube amp, and it suddenly stops working, then there is a good chance it is because you need to replace one of the tubes.

Hope that helps a little.
Quote by System of a Dog
When I told some random fat guy I played guitar, he tried to test me with this melon scratcher:

"What's a plectrum then?"

He didn't even play himself...