#1
Okay, so one day I synced my tremolo picking with 3 finger patterns. Is that a good way to practice alternate picking? Or should I really practice precise DU's or economy picking certain patterns?

People said it sounds good, I guess. (listen to Shred v4, or Shred Guitar playing skill)

Last question, can anyone recommend a scale to practice on so I can get away from constant 1-2-4 patterns?
#2
Run up and down the home position of the minor pentatonic scale and ascend chromatically up the fretboard with strict D U D U picking. Once you reach a high position, stop, and play that same lick, but this time playing U D U D. Repeat this process over and over for many weeks/months/years until you can cleanly play 16th notes at 200 bpm.

Make sure you practice to a metronome or similar click track when you do this.


I just threw the minor pentatonic out there, but you could do it for any scale.

And if you want, I can post some chromatic exercises that will leave your fingers in a knot.


Worry about economy picking AFTER you're good at alternate picking.
#3
Everything BGC said, except I'd add that it's important to mix it up a bit - one exercise can get stale after a while and stop yielding results, that's when it's time to change it up.

To answer what you said about transitioning from tremolo picking into 3 note patterns. There is nothing wrong with this as long as you can stay synched, but the problem is you need more control than this. For example, if you were playing a lick that mixed 16th notes and 8th note triplets, you might have trouble putting the brakes on for the 8th note triplets.

When you get good at alternate picking, there is no difference between it and tremolo picking, btw. You use the same technique for both.
#4
Quote by se012101
For example, if you were playing a lick that mixed 16th notes and 8th note triplets, you might have trouble putting the brakes on for the 8th note triplets. You should get good at 8th note triplets, 16th notes, and 16th note triplets before you try to combine them. As for 32nd notes, just play 16th notes and double the tempo on your metronome. Composers tend to and even go out of their way not to use 32nd notes (without slowing down, of course).

When you get good at alternate picking, there is no difference between it and tremolo picking, btw. You use the same technique for both. Tremolo picking refers specifically to repeatedly picking a single note as fast as you can, often without any regard for staying in time. Aerosmith's "Crazy" is one example of alternate picking; Joe Perry uses the technique in the second verse. Alternate picking refers to the alternation of downstrokes and upstrokes, but the term usually refers to the note changing with every strum or couple of strums. You would also try to stay in time.

The bold is me.
#5
^ absolutely, about getting the feel for 8th note triplets, 16th notes, and 16th note triplets down separately first before combining them. You would be toast if you tried combining them without having the feel of each totally engrained into your being. Especially at a fast tempo.

Regarding, alt and tremolo picking being the "same". I was refering to RH technique. Sometimes I assume everyone on UG can read my mind!
#6
^That's a very good point--you should be using the same hand motion for tremolo picking that you do for alternate picking. If you are using different techniques, that means that you are either limiting your trem picking or limiting your alt. picking in a sense.

One note at what BGC said--while I'm sure she didn't mean this, don't stop at 16th notes at 200 BPM. No reason in not going faster if you can...

The link in my sig regarding excercises should help you find new things to play--I recommend the file called I believe Shred Guitar, made by GuitarDude19.
#7
So, what's the difference? Alternate is using your wrist, while tremolo is using your arm? I probably use a combination of both when picking normally, I just can't seem to get past a certain point by only using the wrist.
#8
They should use the same motion.
The difference is that tremolo picking isn't concerned with timing and precision like alt. picking is. Alternate picking requires very precise timing, typically much more complicated left hand stuff and more string changing.
#9
Quote by TheShred201
^That's a very good point--you should be using the same hand motion for tremolo picking that you do for alternate picking. If you are using different techniques, that means that you are either limiting your trem picking or limiting your alt. picking in a sense.

One note at what BGC said--while I'm sure she didn't mean this, don't stop at 16th notes at 200 BPM. No reason in not going faster if you can...

The link in my sig regarding excercises should help you find new things to play--I recommend the file called I believe Shred Guitar, made by GuitarDude19.


Thanks a lot, everyone.

I'll check out the lessons/exercises when I have free time. Damn homework, lol.
#10
Quote by TheShred201
One note at what BGC said--while I'm sure she didn't mean this, don't stop at 16th notes at 200 BPM. No reason in not going faster if you can...
16ths at 200 bpm is a milestone; I mentioned it because Petrucci said he warmed up with chromatic exercises until he could play 16ths at 200 bpm, though some of his stuff is faster than that in raw notes per second. Obviously try to play them at 300 if you can.