#1
Is this possible by sticking some decent ply on the back? Im thinking of doing it with the vc50 im almost certainly getting, would it cause it to over heat or anything, and presumably it would make it sound tighter and more like that of a cab. Ive heard of people sticking open back combos against walls so thought it might be an idea, anyway your thoughts. Didnt really know where to put this thread so if its in the wrong place...appologies
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#3
so if i got a nice big thick of ply would it have the same effect?
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#5
i think it should be tight enough but would it work and no over heat the amp? And i just prefer combos as there alot easier to transport
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#7
hhhm ok thanks for the help.. just one last question would it overheat? Cause laneys run naturally hot anyway dont they
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#8
It could heat up yea, I wouldn't completely close the back. Ever try pointing your amp at the wall like some bass players do? It's probably not the solution to your problem but try it if you haven't.
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#10
but how often do you replace tubes and what tubes? Well its strange at home my amp is fizzy etc (dsl401 i know thats why im getting the vc50) but in my friends garage it just gets really brittle sounding, anything i could do?
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#11
That's just the environment changing the sound. Nothing sounds good in a garage, since there is so much sound deflection taking place you hear the same sound 100 times in different amplitudes. It's VERY difficult to enjoy the sound coming from a garage...

I'd say just put something behind the combo, you could even lean a piece of wood up behind it (vibration may knock it down?)
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#12
ok cool so its something i look into custom making maybe, anyway oppinions on the vc50/gh100r
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#13
If you want closed back sound the safest and most effective option would probably be a closed back 1x12 cab. You could build one for pretty cheap and throw a decent speaker in there.
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#14
Quote by `digitaL.braVo
That's just the environment changing the sound. Nothing sounds good in a garage, since there is so much sound deflection taking place you hear the same sound 100 times in different amplitudes. It's VERY difficult to enjoy the sound coming from a garage...

I'd say just put something behind the combo, you could even lean a piece of wood up behind it (vibration may knock it down?)

+1. I used to play in a garage. Not only was the acoustic of the place terrible, but the sound bouncing off made it very easy to feedback.

Quote by Varkunus
but how often do you replace tubes and what tubes? Well its strange at home my amp is fizzy etc (dsl401 i know thats why im getting the vc50) but in my friends garage it just gets really brittle sounding, anything i could do?

I haven't needed to replace the tubes yet. It's been over a year.
#16
Just make sure you don't cover up the amp's ventilation, which should be out of the way of where you're covering it up anyway.
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#17
k so just the speakers not the actually tube bit on the top
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#18
First, I presume you're talking about a Laney VC50 and not an old Crate VC50H, right?

I'd think long and hard before doing something like this, and I'd definitely study the physical design of your amp carefully.

Speaker cones generate as much pressure from behind as they do from the front. If you close off the back then you'll definitely increase the bass response from the cab, but that extra pressure has to go somewhere. If it can't escape from the back of the cab then it's going to find an exit up through the chassis of the amp. Do you really want those shock waves travelling through your amp chassis?

As far as heat goes, those vent holes on top are meant to provide a way for the heat to escape from the inside of the chassis, but in order to work they need a way for cooler air to come in from the bottom. Closing off the back of the cab is going to block that pathway, unless you vent the back of the chassis which sort of defeats the purpose of closing the back.

Personally, I'd opt for a closed back extension cab before I thought about closing the back of a combo.
#19
well from what i can gather the vc50 (laney) will get pretty tight anyway http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt2Mu71E1Zw&NR=1 like that but more saturated and more chuggy. Yes i was worred about the vibrations but surely no different to putting it a against a wall?
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#20
Quote by Varkunus
well from what i can gather the vc50 (laney) will get pretty tight anyway http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt2Mu71E1Zw&NR=1 like that but more saturated and more chuggy. Yes i was worred about the vibrations but surely no different to putting it a against a wall?


Putting it against the wall isn't the same as closing off the cab. You're using the wall to reflect the sound leaving the cab from the back. It's not an airtight seal, so you're not forcing nearly as much pressure back into the chassis.
#21
so do closed combos work by closing the back of and isolating the tubes from the speakers? What about making it not completely airtight? Or isolating the tubes..?
Music is the holy grail, sod wine water and the blood of jesus
#22
Quote by Varkunus
so do closed combos work by closing the back of and isolating the tubes from the speakers? What about making it not completely airtight? Or isolating the tubes..?


Well, I haven't seen every closed back combo ever produced, but most of the ones I've seen have bass ports on the front baffle. The Bogner Shiva is an example.

So, yes, they're not airtight.