#1
Hey everybody, i am new here and i just had a couple of questions.

I was wondering how to play bass alongside of a guitarist when making music, but not copying the what the guitarist does?

I was also wondering how to play while the guitarist is strumming chords.

Thanks you guys for your help
#3
^ this
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#4
Another thing is to start listening to different types of music and see how the bass and guitar interact.

And yes, knowing the basic chord and scale theory is a huge help, because you know what is going to compliment musically to what the guitarist is playing.

I've started to play with a guitarist who has written original music and usually on the first play of a song, I'll play roots and start to listen to the chord changes and transitions in the song. The second and third time, I'll start expanding the bass line sonically.

And one of the most important thing about basslines is knowing when to play more and when to play less. Nothing sounds worse than a misplaced busy bass line.
#5
yes i have read much about chord theory and scale theory but i do not know how to apply this to playing with a guitaist
#6
Quote by hambone125
yes i have read much about chord theory and scale theory but i do not know how to apply this to playing with a guitaist


That will help a lot. I'd agree with anarchee about listen to lots of different music, especially, but not exclusively, whatever genre's your band will be playing, and about starting out simple and expanding. That, and a lot of trial and error.
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guitar solo - "meh, every song got one"
bass solo - "OMGZ0R U IS PRO MENZ"


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Sir I would like to sex your bass.
#9
Quote by anarkee
Another thing is to start listening to different types of music and see how the bass and guitar interact.

And yes, knowing the basic chord and scale theory is a huge help, because you know what is going to compliment musically to what the guitarist is playing.

I've started to play with a guitarist who has written original music and usually on the first play of a song, I'll play roots and start to listen to the chord changes and transitions in the song. The second and third time, I'll start expanding the bass line sonically.

And one of the most important thing about basslines is knowing when to play more and when to play less. Nothing sounds worse than a misplaced busy bass line.

Could this lady be any wiser?

My Literature History professor and I were talking the other day, and we talked about how sad it is that, so often today, art emulation is seen as 'bad'. I say, stand on the shoulders of giants - they didn't work in a vacuum either.

And yeah, learning theory is vital. You've got to know the language before you can read the literature, I must say.
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.