#1
Hey guys, I'm looking into getting a new amp and would appreciate any advice.

I currently have a Vox Valvetronix AD30VT and a Dean Hardtail. I really like the versatility and overall sound I can get with this combo but it just sounds a little empty at times.

I would be looking for something a little warmer, probably around 30W. Something that sounds good for general guitar playing but with some power behind it for solos, etc. I generally play more bluesey/classic rock stuff.

Oh and I'm in the UK if that makes a difference. My limit as far as price goes would be around £1000.

Thanks.
#3
Your style and budget is just begging for a Marshall JTM45 clone.

Check out the vintage amps and reissues thread to find some good builders that can make you a terrific amp at a great price. Check out Ceriatone, that, and a decent 2x12 should fit your budget quite well.

http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=954958&highlight=vintage

w/ sound/video clips of all sorts of great amps that will get you a great bluesy, classic rock sound.
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 15, 2008,
#4
Wow, those amps are pretty much exactly what i was looking for. I love the sound. I've heard really good things about Orange amps too so I'd best head to town and try a few out.

Thanks guys.
#5
Here is as list of great classic rock amps. I’m listing them in order of what I think is going to be most suitable for you.

5E5-A tweed pro amp.
They are cathode biased which means smoother distortion and better compression for that "singing" quality, use a 5U4 rectifier, 6l6 power tubes, and they have a 15" speaker. These amps put out about 25~30 watts and are great for blues and classic rock and are probably the best harp amp out there.

5E6-A tweed bassman. (may be hard to find within your budget)
This is basically the same amp as the pro but it has a dual rectifier, fixed bias and 4x10 speakers. It's about 45 to 50 watts but a cathode bias could bring it down to around 30.

5E8-A tweed twin. (may be hard to find within your budget)
It's the same amp as the bassman but it's got 2x12 speakers.

1974 Marshall style amp.
This is one of the most sought after blues amps in the world. When built right they have an aluminum chassis which gives you better high end than steel. These amps are cathode biased class A which means they always sound dirty and grainy but their overdrive is smooth and filled with interesting harmonics.

5E3 Deluxe amp (may be hard to find within your budget)
This is probably the most popular fender amp of all time. It’s circuit is similar to the normal channel of the 18 watt Marshall but there are enough differences in this amp to give it it’s own distinct tone. It’s technically 22 watts but it’s not as loud as the 18 watt marshall. This amp is always dirty and grainy and never cleans up which can be a problem for a lot of people but most people that get this amp don’t want clean tone. It’s great for bedroom playing because it gives you driven tone at around 3 but it’s not great for stage because it stops getting louder at around 5. This amp only has 1 tone control which filters off high end on the mic channel and does next to nothing on the instrument channel but most people use the mic channel on this amp. The volume controls on this amp are interactive which means by changing the volume of the unused channel it’ll change the tone of the channel you are using. This helps compensate for only having 1 real tone knob.

Blackface Princeton Reverb.
This is supposedly only a 12 watt amp but with the addition of a midrange boost switch they can easily get up to 22 watts. It's a blackface style amp so it's easy to make it sound cold and bright but with a little know how it can also be very warm. If you do get this amp I'd suggest adding a cathode bias switch and the midrange boost switch because that will really help warm things up and give you amazing versatility. As an added bonus this amp has tremolo and reverb

Blackface super reverb. (wont be found in your budget)
This has the same tonal flavor of the Princeton but it's got 2 channels, a bright switch, adjustable midrange, and a whole lot more power. It was the favorite stage amp of SRV so you know it can handle blues! It puts out between 45 and 50 watts but by adding a cathode bias switch it can be brought down to around 30 watts and you can easily unplug 1 speaker which will give you even less volume and a warmer more compressed tone. One of my favorite futures of this amp is that by plugging the reverb tank into the normal channel you can get reverb with adjustable bass, midrange, and treble which is very very cool. I list this amp after the Princeton only because it's about 100 quid out of your budget.

Reissues of these amps are OK but nothing like the boutique reproductions or kits that are available. I makes most (but not all) of the amps I listed and I can get most of them for you under budget so if you are interested it could be worth your while to contact me. If you have electrical experience then the cheapest (and possibly the best) is to get yourself a good kit. Ceriatone kits are better than reissue amps but not as good as the kits made by Mojotone. Ceriatone kits are, however, much more affordable than mojo kits. TAD, Allparts, and Myself are all sell EU distributors for Mojotone kits.
Not taking any online orders.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at Sep 15, 2008,
#6
For £1000, I would definitely be looking at boutique amps.

You could get a Cornford which are amazing amps. All handmade and handwired to a brilliant standard using top quality components. They are amazing amps for rock and blues, and the voicing of them is superb. Creamy, smooth, round and full. In this price range, they really are the ones to be going for.

If you want 30W, then the new Cornford Roadhouse 30 is the perfect choice. This model is the only model that isn't handwired, but it is still hand assembled and the electronics are mounted on a NASA quality PCB. It's about £750

The Cornford Carrera is smack on £1000 and is fully hand wired. This amp allows you to switch to different valve types so you can experiment more with the tone. Granted this amp is only 8W or something, that is still going to be loud enough for your average gig. Remember valves are far louder than solid state.

But yeh personally. the Roadhouse 30 would be the perfect amp for you.
#7
If I had a grand to spend on a blues/classic rock amp i would look at the laney vc30 and peavey classic, that way you save loads of money. A laney vc30 went on ebay yesterday for £120 i think it was and they are quality amps, a few decent pedals would get you into other genres to i bet. its worth a look anyway Can i just ask how you like the dean hardtail as well? which one do you have? standard/select? good luck
My Beginner setup:
Ibanez rg321mh
Roland Micro cube
#8
I just checked those Cornford amps on YouTube and wow... they sound awesome.
Now I just need to find one lol.

As far as the Dean goes, I was really surprised by how much I liked it. Really comfortable to play and the neck is just right. Holds tuning really well too.

I'm not sure about the whole Standard/Select thing though lol. I had a look on the Dean website to try and find my model and I can't find a Standard in TransAmber so I'm guessing its a Select. If so then it was a great deal.
#9
Quote by Snake_42
I just checked those Cornford amps on YouTube and wow... they sound awesome.
Now I just need to find one lol.
.



Good man

What's great about Cornford too, is that they are a small company, you can actually phone them up and speak to Paul Cornford himself or one of the other engineers. They are a pleasure to speak to and are extremely helpful.

But yeh, they really are fantastic amps
#10
#11
Quote by Snake_42
I just checked those Cornford amps on YouTube and wow... they sound awesome.
Now I just need to find one lol.

As far as the Dean goes, I was really surprised by how much I liked it. Really comfortable to play and the neck is just right. Holds tuning really well too.

I'm not sure about the whole Standard/Select thing though lol. I had a look on the Dean website to try and find my model and I can't find a Standard in TransAmber so I'm guessing its a Select. If so then it was a great deal.


Standards were typically solid body while the selects had flamed tops. I prefer the flamed myself. Also the pickups were tappable on the standards. deans are my favorite Brand. I've got 4 of them.
Dean Icon PZ
Line 6 Variax 700
Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#12
Quote by scott58
Standards were typically solid body while the selects had flamed tops. I prefer the flamed myself. Also the pickups were tappable on the standards. deans are my favorite Brand. I've got 4 of them.


I got one with a flamed maple top and the push/pull pots. Is there any other way I can tell the difference?