#3
People can argu for days about how much wood matters when it comes to tone, but I think the general consensus is about equal to the importance of pickups.

As for which are best, ash and mahogany are usually at the top, with agathis and basswood nearer the bottom. Although basswood can be used for higher quality stuff too, but that tends to be more metal-specific.
#5
wood is very important for the sound in particular the hardest woods like teak, mahogany etc. All woods have a tone and hardwoods have a ring!!. You can use other man made materials like some of the hard plastics but the you would be better of going through a sound modeller to improve tonal quality. Hope that helps.
#7
Quote by SugarRush66
As for which are best, ash and mahogany are usually at the top, with agathis and basswood nearer the bottom. Although basswood can be used for higher quality stuff too, but that tends to be more metal-specific.

What?


High-end Fender Strat and low-end Squier Strat = alder

High-end Fender Tele = ash

Mid- to high-end Ibanez = basswood

High-end Gibson and Mid-range Epiphone = mahogany


There are varying qualities of each wood. For example, rosewood is used on probably most fingerboards, but Brazilian rosewood is highly prized, especially on early Les Pauls.
#8
Its very important, a Les Paul for example has a mahogany back and a maple top as the properties of both complement each other, the mahogany has a darker thick sound where the maple is a bright sounding wood.
#9
So if I wanted a semi-hollow guitar for playing blues, rosewood or mahogany would be two good choices, correct?

And for a Les Paul used for things like Hendrix and Buckethead, would I want something brighter?
#10
Quote by Baby Joel
So if I wanted a semi-hollow guitar for playing blues, rosewood or mahogany would be two good choices, correct?

And for a Les Paul used for things like Hendrix and Buckethead, would I want something brighter?

There are usually 2 or 3 different woods in a guitar: for example, a Fender Strat has an alder body, a maple neck, and can have a rosewood fingerboard.

It would be easier to advise on what guitar to get by your budget. You can get some guitars which have "proper" woods in them - like mahogany - but are otherwise crap.
#11
Quote by blue_strat
What?


High-end Fender Strat and low-end Squier Strat = alder

High-end Fender Tele = ash

Mid- to high-end Ibanez = basswood

High-end Gibson and Mid-range Epiphone = mahogany

There are varying qualities of each wood. For example, rosewood is used on probably most fingerboards, but Brazilian rosewood is highly prized, especially on early Les Pauls.


Yeah, I know it was too generalised, I was just trying to give a general idea.

'Pologies
#12
Quote by Baby Joel
So if I wanted a semi-hollow guitar for playing blues, rosewood or mahogany would be two good choices, correct?


Most semi-hollowbodies are made of maple, including guitars often used in blues.
This space foreclosed, due to the ailing economy.