#1
Sup UG

Quick and painless question. Most of my favorite songs/bands, are pretty much moderately fast songs. I hear the constant stream of "Speed comes with time" speeches all the time, so I've just been wondering; with about 5 months of constant practice, should I just do moderately fast songs which I wont have to work extremely hard to play up to speed, (Foo Fighters, some Metallica, Paramore, stuff like that), or should I try to do one or two songs that are ones that I really want to play, but will take a hefty amount of time to perfect it (The Fall of Troy, Avenged Sevenfold, etc.)?

Which do you think will benefit a beginner more?
#2
Its all down to the individual really mate, why not combine your two ideas, learn to play both easy and hard things, have you ever had lessons? If not i'd strongly recommend them as your tutor will be able to help you with whatever you want to learn/improve.
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#3
Nope, never had tutors/teachers, anything like that. The only teacher I've had thus for are the good folks here, and GP5. I'm a college student and I have very awkward schedules and the money for a teacher might be kind of hard as well, so I dont think that is much of an option.

I've noticed that I can play some of my fav songs that are easy songs, but those other songs, they apply the same techniques and some hammer and pulls here and there, but its just completely faster, on an different level. I'm playing for fun and not just with the goal of becoming in a band or anything, its just that being able to play an Fall of Troy song would blow my mind completely. I want to be there badly, but I dont know if I'm getting in over my head here, and should probably take it slower.
#4
Speed should never be at the forefront of your thoughts, it's best consigned to the backburner.

The reason is simply because you have no direct control over it, it's a by-product of a load of other things that you can control.

You can work on your accuracy and the synchronization of your two hands
you can improve your dexterity with finger independence exercises
you can build stamina with technical drills
you can improve your speed of thought by increasing your fretboard knowledge and understanding of the instrument

all those things together govern how fast you'll be able to play but speed itself isn't actually a skill, just a reflection of it.
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#5
I think Mr. Seagull just hit the nail on the head, as for lessons go you can get away with having one every 2 weeks or just whenever you can afford it, i'm not saying it a requirement but when I finally got round to getting one it helped immensely.
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#6
So how do I get there, to where I want to be? I'm not asking something like "how to get good" or anything of that sort, I'm just asking how do I progress?

Most of what I've been doing up till this point was using GP5 and slowing down a tab that I want to play, and increasing it gradually. I've also been looking at some of the finger strength and hammer on and dexterity lessons, but thats all so far. Anything you guys have in mind?
#7
How do you progress? You just gotta keep at it... play that difficult riff over and over again, at varying speeds so you can see that you can play it at the correct tempo, yet play it cleanly. Maybe learn some other techniques, learn the fretboard, scale patterns and such.
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#8
Quote by JadedWolf465
So how do I get there, to where I want to be? I'm not asking something like "how to get good" or anything of that sort, I'm just asking how do I progress?

Most of what I've been doing up till this point was using GP5 and slowing down a tab that I want to play, and increasing it gradually. I've also been looking at some of the finger strength and hammer on and dexterity lessons, but thats all so far. Anything you guys have in mind?

It's all about the mindset...how you approach the instrument.

If you simply focus on "learning to play the guitar" and embrace everything you can about it you'll get "good". Every new song you learn, every new technique you pickup, every new genre you explore...it all helps you progress and develop and speed is just one of those things that develops along the way.

Far too many guitarists seem to equate better with faster, so they focus all their efforts on getting "better" rather than actually learning to play the instrument. That tends to leave you with gaping holes in your knowledge because you rushed ahead like it's some kind of race which is ludicrous...the ability to sweep pick or shred scales at 160bpm is worthless if you can't bend notes to pitch consistently or play in time.

The most important facets of a guitarist's playing are the ears...so many people don't seem to actually listen to whay they play, a sense of rhythm and timing, and the ability to play whatever it is you're playing cleanly and accurately. Focus on stuff like that and practice regularly and dilligently and you WILL get better...just don't worry about getting better too much.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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