#1
alright so i really need help with these problems i am faced with. To start off with how many newtons equal a pound(lb.)?
what is net force?
and what is newton's second law?

the reason i ask these questions is because i didn't bring home my science book which has all of these!
o well, if you can help thanks!
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#5
I have heard of this new and revolutionary technology called "schooling". I hear they make kids these days sit in these things called "classes", and there's a "teacher" that "teaches" you. All you have to do is "listen" and "pay attention".
#8
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and make sure to turn the safe search on!

how many newtons fit in a pound.....? -page loads-
#9
thanks for the help you guys!!!!!!!
Guitars:
'13 MIM Fender Strat - '05 Epi G-400
Amps:
Fender HRD - VHT Special 6 Ultra -
Jet City JCA20H - Mesa Rectifier 2x12
Pedulz:
Slash Wah - OCD v1.7 - Red Llama MKII -
Big Muff Pi - Carbon Copy - Phase 90 - Ditto Looper
#11
1.) 1 newton = 0.224808943 pounds force

2.)Net Force

3.) F = ma - Force = mass x acceleration. Or, if you want to sound slightly cleverer, Force is equal to the rate of change of momentum (generally). "the acceleration of an object is proportional to the force applied, and inversely proportional to the mass of the object"

Wikipedia answers all. Next time, pay attention in class
#12
I, like most others, advise using google.

But a question of my own, TS, is your first name Bob perchance?
#14
yes google is the way to go !!
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#15
#16
Quote by B. Heath
alright so i really need help with these problems i am faced with. To start off with how many newtons equal a pound(lb.)?
what is net force?
and what is newton's second law?

the reason i ask these questions is because i didn't bring home my science book which has all of these!
o well, if you can help thanks!

I don't want to piss anyone off but trying to equate Newtons and pounds directly is nonsense, one is a unit of force, the other a unit of mass. It sounds like the answer you're after is the force exerted by 1 pound roughly at sea level, but this will vary as you vary the acceleration due to gravity. I wouldn't normally post something like this but it is a concept you really should be aware of if you are learning Newton's second law.

Just be aware of the F=ma relationship and also (if you want to be exact) that the value of the acceleration due to gravity varies very slightly as you change altitude and move closer and further away from the equator.
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