#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You play it and then immediately move to the next note, often with a hammer-on or slide.



I forget, is it included as a count in the measure?
#5
Quote by Guitarfreak777
I forget, is it included as a count in the measure?


Nope. You play the grace note a fraction before the beat, then the main note actually on the beat.
#6
Quote by se012101
Nope. You play the grace note a fraction before the beat, then the main note actually on the beat.



Thanks, thats what I thought.
#7
It is a note which doesn't fall into a beat but is played before the note that does fall in said beat (meh crappy definition)
It could be fast or not, I don't know too many cases...

It is usually done as decoration (or something like that), like in Baroque music and stuff (sounds nice when done in waltzs and some other stuff)
#8
A great example is the first note of the main opening riff of Jimi Hendrix's Purple Haze. It has a little grace note leading into it.
#11
Quote by XxGibsonSGxX
Thanks all.

Looks like I'm gonna need to perfect these.

If it says there's a grace note, it means you have to play it and can't leave it out, right?


Well, yeah, if the score says so..

Unless you are doing a transposition and maybe you can then leave them out...

EDIT:But most scores leave things for interpretation, so it depends...
#12
Quote by gonzaw
Unless you are doing a transposition and maybe you can then leave them out...
You would keep it if you simply changed the key, but you can omit the grace note if you prefer the sound without said note.
#13
Also, the grace note isn't always before the beat. It's quite often right on the beat and then immediately slid up to the next. It is though, as mentioned, a generally optional ornamental note that isn't counted in the rhythmic notation.
#14
That's it, "ornamental" I couldn't remember the name....

Quote by bangoodcharlote
You would keep it if you simply changed the key, but you can omit the grace note if you prefer the sound without said note.


I was more talking about different instruments transposition, like for instance if you transpose to a xilophone from a guitar score, you can leave grace notes behind (lol can't find a proper example)...
#15
in sheet music, ornamentation such as grace notes are supposed to be left up to interpretation.
#16
Use your ear, if taking the note out doesn't take away from the piece, then leave it out, if it does, keep it. The only time this rule doesn't apply is if your in a formal setting where the employer, composer, teaching says to keep it.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#17
Grace notes are usually either acciaccaturas or appoggiaturas (I hope i've spelt that right).

Acciaccaturas are shown as a small note with a line through it which is before a note. These notes are supposed to be played for as little time as possible (though they should be heard, obviously) and they can be played before or on the beat (the performer can choose).

Appoggiaturas as also known as leaning notes. They are shown as small notes before the main note (with no line through them, which is the difference). They are played on the beat.
If the no. of beats in the note it is in front of is divisible by two (eg, minims or crotchets) then it takes half the time of the note (so an appoggiatura followed by a minim would be played as two crotchets). If the no. of beats isn't divisible by 2 but divisible by three (eg, dotted something) then instead of taking half the time anyway, it takes 1/3 of the time. So an appoggiatura followed by a dotted minim would be played as a crotchet and a minim.
Appoggiaturas were used in baroque and classical times mainly, and were used (instead of just writing the notes) for something to do with showing which notes were harmonious (i'm not quite sure). They aren't used much in writing modern music.

Grace notes, and ornaments in general, are usually optional. In baroque times performers would often add in ornaments that weren't written and would just as easily leave out any that were written in. Usually a melody will sound very similar without the grace notes as they are rarely a main part of the melody.
#18
Quote by 12345abcd3
Appoggiaturas were used in baroque and classical times mainly, and were used (instead of just writing the notes) for something to do with showing which notes were harmonious (i'm not quite sure). They aren't used much in writing modern music.


what has this world come to...no respect for the people who made music what is today.

isn't a grace note like a short trill, quick slide/hammer-on or a pick up note?
#19
...grace notes are played in time with the song, leading up to the next note, which then carries it's written sustain time. If the grace note has a slash through it, then you hit in and move on as quickly as possible--which makes it more of an embellishment on the actual melody line. Seems like there's a lot of confusion in this thread, but maybe it's just me?
#20
i think everything is clear here ...
everyone must use GuitarPro , it'll clear lots of things like these ..