#1
Hi guys,

Im about to buy my first ukulele, and iv played on my friends long enough to know im going to stick at it, so im going to get one that will last a while.
I was originally going electro-acoustic for recording, but thought ii could get better for my money if i didnt.

I'v found this - Link

I dont really like the shape, but the wood looks georgeous, it also has good machineheads. And one more thing that put me off this uke, can you get hard cases for pineapple shaped ones? As i couldn't find them, but a soft case would do.

Price limit around £30, £45-£50 with case.

Any help?
#3
Beautiful ukulele, nevermind the shape, it won't obstruct you or anything. The best thign about ukuleles is that there's not much hairachy in how good ukes are, you can pretty much stick to your beginner uke for the rest of your time playing it.

Definitely worth it, I'd go for it.
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#5
Aloha,

Don't get a flying v
the sound quality is bad as they are only for looks, for the best uke sound get a wooden one in standard or pineapple shape. Dont get plywood... u have to get solid wood....otherwise the sound is not as clean.

you can get a good beginner/intermediate uke for 30-40 pounds.
They also come in 4 different sizes, soprano, concert, tenor, baritone, in order from smallest to largest, so a soprano one works well for the comedy factor.

The one on your link, looks amazing! BUY IT!
If its a gd music shop it should come with a case....

Ukuleles are amazing, but the go out of tune very quickly...which is the one annoying thing....

However, they are great!
And one last tip...never play a uke when ur feeling sad....
They are happy haiwaiian feel good music makers...
#7
The Gibson uke is a good one and all solid wood. A vintage one [50's -60's] in good condition would cost about $400 though. For the sound they produce they are worth it.
Last edited by Akabilk at Sep 18, 2008,
#8
Pineapple ukulele have a pretty interesting sound; I recommend them to the beginner. Just saying "mahogany" doesn't mean it's solid wood. I'd phone or email to make sure. I can't recommend anything but solid wood, even for the beginner.

Edit: and for the future reference of anyone browsing this thread, the plural of ukulele is ukulele, and the correct grammatical article is "an ukulele." It's pronounced "oo-koo-lay-lay."
Sincerely, Chad.
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#9
Quote by Chad48309

Edit: and for the future reference of anyone browsing this thread, the plural of ukulele is ukulele, and the correct grammatical article is "an ukulele." It's pronounced "oo-koo-lay-lay."

Stickler for grammar eh? Easier just to call it a uke.

I bought a cheap uke for $70 or so about a year and half ago. It's just for fun really, jamming with buddies a bit too. It hasn't let me down yet.

Some of those $600 Koaloha's and Kamaka's are really beautiful though.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#10
^^ that pineapple would be a great choice although probably not solid -- I think you may have a wider selection than you think! Solid ukes are great, but I love my laminated Lanikai ukes. I put them in a gig bag with a shoulder strap and carry them with me on the weekends -- I wouldn't dare do that with a high-dollar uke!!

edit: don't worry about what the ad says about friction tuners -- They work just fine!! The real tuning hassle is waiting for the strings to stretch and settle in.

edit2: check out a gig bag -- they make some really nice ones that will protect a ukulele really well http://www.ukuleleworld.com/home.php?cat=13
Last edited by milagroso at Sep 19, 2008,