#1
Right, so the rig is:

Interface - PreSonus FP10
Software - Sonar 7 Studio Edition OR Cubase LE (Which comes free with the interface)
Monitors - M-Audio BX5a
Mics - Sampson 5-piece drum mics, Shure SM 57 - (For guitar , bass and vocals, and as an overhead for the drums)
Cables, Leads etc

This is for recording a whole band, and as it's costing upwards of £700, the very least i want it to be able to do is make Demo's worthy of sending to Club owners (As a press kit sort of thing), but i would also like to make comercially sellable products.

The question is, is this all i need? And is the free Cubase LE any good? (I think it's pretty old). I don't want to skimp on software, but is it worth investing that £100 in more mics if i've already got the cubase?

And finally, can any of you recording wizards think of a better way to set up a home studio with £700? I'm welcome to all suggestions
#2
That looks like a damn good setup to me, I run Cubase LE and it works perfectly for me, what you can do is download some free VST plugins and it makes it like ten times better. My friend also "file shared" a bunch of programs for me, since i'm not good with that stuff and it's basically amazing now. But I'm not condoning stealing or sharing files in anyway.
#3
Cubase LE will be fine. With a new interface, it will come with version 4, which is the latest one. It won't be Cubase 4... it will be LE4.... but version 4 nonetheless.

If you have any money left over, consider:
-a vocal mic - usu. large diaphragm condensor
-a nice DI for bass, like a SansAmp
-headphones for tracking
-some sort of hardware FX that you can use to provide effects - especially when tracking singers.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Quote by axemanchris

If you have any money left over, consider:
-a nice DI for bass, like a SansAmp


This. Skip the mic and DI if you can. Even if you can't afford it, try plugging the bass directly into the interface when recording, then you use a VST to process the track later. Something like Helians 1st or 2nd bass plugin. It will sound better than that 57 on a bass amp.
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#5
Ok cheers guys, i'm gonna stick with the Cubase LE, and look into the plugins. I can't afford the Sansamp, however when i get the stuff i'll try out both micing the bass and DI'ing to see what results i get.

I'll look into getting a condenser, which could possibly be used as another overhead as well as a vocal mic?

And could you expand on this 'Hardware FX', what excactly do you mean?

Thanks for all the help
#6
Hardware FX usually means reverb. It helps the singer hear themselves in a relatively natural way...improving their performance. This is probably all that you'll need.
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#7
You may not need a DI box. Try plugging the bass guitar directly into the interface and use VSTs for post processing. I recommend Helian's...
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#8
Ok, VST's are plugins, right? (like plugins specialized to cubase)

Also, would it be worth getting a cheap condenser (like a behringer as a sort of all round mic for overheads, vocals, bass etc?
#9
Yes a VST is a plugin, but it's not specific to Cubase. It's standard that lots of programs support. Helians is a free VST plugin that emulates a bass amp (quite well I might add).

Typically you wouldn't mic a bass cab with a condenser mic. But for vocals and acoustic it would improve your sound if you went for a half decent large diaphragm condenser.
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#10
Quote by Mass Extinction

I'll look into getting a condenser, which could possibly be used as another overhead as well as a vocal mic?


Yes.

Quote by Mass Extinction

And could you expand on this 'Hardware FX', what excactly do you mean?


For vocals, typically reverb and/or delay. I have this, and it wasn't prohibitively expensive, and TC Electronic is among the best brands in the business.

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/TC-Electronic-M300-DualEngine-Processor?sku=241600 (replaced by the M350)

I run a set of outputs on my interface to the digital ins (spdif) of the M300, and from the M300 back to the interface (again, via the spdif digital outs). Because this is hardware routing, and is not being processed by the computer, I can have the singer hear his/her voice with reverb/delay whatever and not have it recorded.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.