#1
Hi there all. I THOUGHT I knew what the blues was, listening to SRV and Hendrix and the everyday, jamming on some progressions and generally thinking i was a master of it....

But then i discovered Robert Johnson, such raw and powerful music, and a whole other kind of blues. anyway, I know the standard progression uses the I IV and V chords. But then i heard this Robert Johnson song Love in Vain which if played in G uses G, C, then it does something funny and on the 9th bar it goes to an A. which (correct me if im wrong) is using I IV and II? it sounded so cool and melencholy i just wanted to know if that was a regular blues thing, or something weird and how it works.

what other kinds of variations on blues progressions are there?
Originally Posted by Kill Factory
If you want to play some emo music, I recommend using these settings:


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Master Volume: 0

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#2
Yes a G, to C to A is a I IV and II. But I don't know what else to tell you, he was a master.
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#3
ah cool. Yes, i thought it was such an interestion change of melody compared to what I've come to expect
Originally Posted by Kill Factory
If you want to play some emo music, I recommend using these settings:


Gain: 0
Bass: 0
Mid: 0
Treble: 0

Master Volume: 0

HAHA!
#4
You can learn the basic 12 bar blues.
measure 1 - I
measure 2 - V
measure 3&4- I
measure 5 &6 - V
measure 7&8 - I
measure 9- VI
measure 10- V
measure 11&12- I

note that all of these chords would be the 7th version of whatever key you are in so like if you are playing in Bb it would be Bb7 for I and Eb7 for V and F7 for VI
#5
Quote by Martian980
You can learn the basic 12 bar blues.
measure 1 - I
measure 2 - V
measure 3&4- I
measure 5 &6 - V
measure 7&8 - I
measure 9- VI
measure 10- V
measure 11&12- I

note that all of these chords would be the 7th version of whatever key you are in so like if you are playing in Bb it would be Bb7 for I and Eb7 for V and F7 for VI


Martian, The basic blues progression is I, IV, V (1, 4, 5)...not I, V, VI (1, 5, 6). So in your above theory, all your V's should be IV's, and your VI should be V. In your example Bb7, Eb7, F7, the Eb7 is IV, not V, and F7 is V, not VI. Check out the Bb scale: Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G, A, Bb... Eb is the fourth (IV), and F is the fifth (V).
"and when you lose control, you'll reap the harvest that you've sewn"
#6
Cobaindrix, 12-bar blues are the basic building blocks but the rules... what rules? Everything is right at the right time. II is pretty common. Try this Robert Johnson progression with a II and a VI ('from four til late') in D (all barred except VI, V). give each two counts on 4/4: I7, IV7, I7, chromatic chord run down to VI7. IV7, IV7, I7 same run to VI7. II7, V7, I7(three count turn around to), V7(one count).
"and when you lose control, you'll reap the harvest that you've sewn"
#7
If you think RJ has some odd stuff, listen to some Howlin Wolf and John Lee Hooker.
#8
yer listein to howlin wolf. and then once you think you have done the basics you could move onto jazz blues progressions. o and you should learn some minor blues progressions as well.
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King