#1
I have a nice heavy breakdown riff that I'm happy with, only I'd like to know how to separate it into a more friendly format.

Currently it's got one bar of 4/4 and then a bar of 9/8, then the riff starts again except for the second time around it'sa bar of 4/4 again and then it changes to 6/8 or 3/4.

In short, 4/4 -> 9/8 -> 4/4 -> 3/4

Is there any way to simplify this other than making it a bar of 17/8 and a bar of 14/8 or a bar of 31/8? >.<
I'm so metal I work at Dimmu Burger
#3
Exchange the 9/8 for 4/4 and use a fermata on the extra eigth. That's the best I can come up with. By default, Fermata doubles the length of whatever you put it on top, whether a note or rest, but the performer can hold it for more.
Last edited by one vision at Sep 17, 2008,
#4
Yeah, what's wrong with changing time signatures? I'd say leave it as is as long as it sounds good.
#5
"Fermata" means that you hold the note until the conductor tells you to move on, so that post is completely wrong.

Don't simplify it. You've written something complex; leave it complex. To write it in 17/8 would probably be wrong anyway, as your beat is probably the quarter note and writing something in x/8 time implies that the 8th note gets the beat or the meter is compound time.

Another thing: Do you know the difference between 3/4 and 6/8 and why they are ABSOLUTELY NOT the same?
#6
Another thing: Do you know the difference between 3/4 and 6/8 and why they are ABSOLUTELY NOT the same?


BGC is correct. 6/8 is a compound time signature and utilizes a dotted note as the bear unit. When dealing with compound meters, they should be interpreted as follows...

- Divide the number of beats by three. In this case, six divided by three is two. 6/8, therefore, has two beats per bar.

- Multiply the beat unit by three. Each beat, therefore, has a length of three eighth notes, or a dotted quarter note.

Where 3/4 would be counted: 1 and 2 and 3 and 1 and 2 and 3 etc...

6/8 is counted: 1 and uh 2 and uh 1 and uh 2 and uh etc...

It's entirely possible to write a passage with six eighth note beats per bar, but keep in mind that 6/8 will be interpreted by the reader or performer as compound unless you explicitly state otherwise.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
"Fermata" means that you hold the note until the conductor tells you to move on, so that post is completely wrong.

Another thing: Do you know the difference between 3/4 and 6/8 and why they are ABSOLUTELY NOT the same?

The way I learned it was the way I've posted, "approximately double".
Wiki: "Exactly how much longer it is held is up to the discretion of the performer or conductor, but twice as long is not unusual".
But I'll take your word for it, since fermata isn't a very precise indication of time anyways.

And yes I know the difference, probably a typo. I don't know why I put 3/4, I know that they aren't "simplified" like that. Thanks for the correction.
#8
Quote by one vision
The way I learned it was the way I've posted, "approximately double".
Wiki: "Exactly how much longer it is held is up to the discretion of the performer or conductor, but twice as long is not unusual".
But I'll take your word for it, since fermata isn't a very precise indication of time anyways.

And yes I know the difference, probably a typo. I don't know why I put 3/4, I know that they aren't "simplified" like that. Thanks for the correction.

Exactly. Common, yes, and a good rule of thumb for solo/chamber performances where there is no conductor, but not absolute.
Stick to what you have, it was written that way for a reason. Trust me, there are plenty of songs that change time signatures a lot like that. You should probably figure out which time the last measure is in though, see the above posts for details. What's the rhythm in that measure?