#1
How many lessons do you think is fair to give a teacher before judging them?

I’ve just started doing lessons with a teacher, and so far and both ‘lessons’ have consisted of him putting his favourite rock song on the CD player, showing me the chord shapes for each passage of the song and then he plays along to the song while I attempt to keep up.

2 Lessons, 2 songs shown (I wouldn’t say taught). For the money I’ve paid I could have bought 3 or 4 song books with dozens of songs to learn.

I’ve come away from both lessons with nothing gained, no new techniques to practice, no new theory to study, no new skills to try and master. I know exactly as much about guitar now as I did 2 weeks ago.

I quizzed the teacher last night about what the next few lessons were going to cover and was basically told that each week will be more of the same.

Is 2 lessons enough for me to make a fair judgment here and bail on this guy in search of a new teacher?
#2
id wait a little longer, but tell him what you feel. he might change what he teaches
#4
People around here say that like 4 lessons are what you should do before judging to bail out.

I've only had 1 lesson so far, I told my teacher what I had currently learned and that I wanted to explore the fundamentals further and improvising. We spent the whole first lesson of him figuring out what I knew and working a bit on my improvisation, teaching me a new scale, as well as giving me tips with chord changes and tips regarding improvisation. We'll see how my next couple of lessons go.

So far it doesn't sound like your teacher is doing much, but I think maybe you should talk to him if that's not what you want to do. I told my teacher a bit of what I had learned and what I was looking for and that's exactly what he did, we worked a bit on my improvisation of scales technique and just some general music theory.
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#5
Yeah, you guys are right, I'm just letting my crappy mood get away from me today . I'll give it a fair chance before doing anything rash and I'll definately talk to him about what my goals are and what I want to achieve.
#6
i also just had my first lesson the other day, and the teach showed me some basic technique,(fingering for scales and chords)discussed my goals and music style, gave me some theory excercises to practice for the next lesson, t=showed me a little about the guitar itself, how important tuning is and so on and so forth, I was quite impressed! I would have a hard time going back as well if i were you...but i agree that you should stick it out a bit and talk about wha you expect and what is expected of you. Good luck.
#7
I'm a teacher myself and we all have different teaching styles.

When it comes to playing a guitar, there are SO many idosyncracies. What it takes is time. Just like anything...experience is everything.

The first question I ask my students is, what makes you want to learn how to play guitar? We all have an inspiration to wanting to play and that's what your teacher should be focusing on.

Also...a good teacher will teach you how to teach yourself and how to stay inspired. After all, YOU are the one has to put the time into it. There's only so much you learn just from a couple half hour lessons.

The secrets to improving...just keep playing...that simple...doesn't even what you play, just as you keep playing.

There's gotta be a song you totally want to learn and usually it's a song you heard a thousand times and it's in your head already. Take a copy of that song with you to your next lesson and tell your teacher I want to learn this. This is the easiest and most fun way to learn how to play.

The toughest barrier to cross is your hands and fingers. Your brain will learn a song WAY before your hands do. All you have to do is take the time to teach your hands what your brain ALREADY knows.

If you can sing it in your head...you can play it on guitar.

On last thing:
Hopefully you know how to read guitar TAB. Find the TAB for a song you are really familiar with. Then sit down with your CD and TAB and start working it out. Take it one riff at a time, then try and put all the pieces together.

You don't need to know theory, chords and scales to play songs. You just need to remember the patterns.

Good Luck!
#8
Maybe there are two sides to the story, but it doesn't sound like he's teaching anything to you in a way that you are receptive to learning. I'm guessing you are moderately interested in the songs he is choosing, but nothing inspiring. If he is actually trying to teach you something specific, it doesn't seem like it is coming through. Those seem to be pretty big strikes to me.

I can see giving him another lesson or two to interest you, but I wouldn't hang around for much longer unless things dramatically improve. Looking at things through the lens of my experiences, when I am actively taking lessons it is the 30 minutes that I look forward to the most out of the week, and it flies by so fast it is amazing. The first lesson I took with my current teacher, we basically discussed guitarists and guitar styles for almost the whole lesson to target appropriate things to learn.

Taking lessons should be a fun and productive experience.
#9
Quote by Jaksar
How many lessons do you think is fair to give a teacher before judging them?

I’ve just started doing lessons with a teacher, and so far and both ‘lessons’ have consisted of him putting his favourite rock song on the CD player, showing me the chord shapes for each passage of the song and then he plays along to the song while I attempt to keep up.

2 Lessons, 2 songs shown (I wouldn’t say taught). For the money I’ve paid I could have bought 3 or 4 song books with dozens of songs to learn.

I’ve come away from both lessons with nothing gained, no new techniques to practice, no new theory to study, no new skills to try and master. I know exactly as much about guitar now as I did 2 weeks ago.

I quizzed the teacher last night about what the next few lessons were going to cover and was basically told that each week will be more of the same.

Is 2 lessons enough for me to make a fair judgment here and bail on this guy in search of a new teacher?


As far as teachers goes this sounds pretty piss-poor, but I have a very limited experience with teachers and their methods. I don't believe I would last more than 4 lessons the way he's teaching you.

The one teacher I have has been pretty great. At least in my opinion, and considering I'm the one doing the learning that is prolly the only opinion that counts. He usually has me pick out a song I want to play... the idea is that if I am playing music I am interested in then I am more likely to practice and play it.

In the beginning he'd tab out some of the riffs and then we would go over them. He'd give me constructive advice like finger placement, how I'm holding the instrument, etc. Then I would have some time to work on those riffs and get comfortable with it (on my own). The pace moves as fast as I learn.

This isn't to say that you should be thrown into material beyond your skill level, but there are likely plenty of tunes you would like to play that are possible when starting that will help build your skill level up as you go.
#10
i've had 2 guitar lessons here at my university.

my teacher has got a feel that i know my standard chords and barre chords and all the like. he started by teaching me the 7th chords and then a little bit of improvising in the blues scale. he also noted that my fingers work for me in all those odd chord shapes.

i just got back from one and my teacher asked what i wanted to play and i just replied jazz. i learned some more chords for rhythm. really you should ask the teacher to teach you what you want to learn. if he doesn't or cant ask him to teach you the process you need to in order to get up to that point.
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#11
Thanks for the advice guys.

I guess my biggest issue is that I want to become a 'guitarist' and not just a jukebox. I wan't to learn the 'instrument', not just how to use it to bang out tunes to impress the crowds at parties on the weekend. Anyone can memorise chord shapes and the order they go in to play a song. I want to learn the notes in those chords, the reason those chords were chosen, how that riff was constructed. why the note of that solo sound so good together.

I'll definately convey this to my teacher, perhaps his approach to teaching me might change once I make him better understand my goals and aims.