#1
i don't understand octaves. I looked at the sticky posting and searched the web but still don't understand. So if you hit the A string open and hit G string second fret that is an octave? cause there aren't eight A's between them. What am i missing?
#2
There are 12 'semitones' between them. If you go around the entire circle from one note to another it's A-A#-B-C-C#-D-D#-E-F-F#-G-G#-A. On the guitar neck a semitone is one fret. That's why you can play an open string, and then play that notes octave at the 12th fret.
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#3
Quote by Kentris.5
There are 12 'semitones' between them. If you go around the entire circle from one note to another it's A-A#-B-C-C#-D-D#-E-F-F#-G-G#-A. On the guitar neck a semitone is one fret. That's why you can play an open string, and then play that notes octave at the 12th fret.


im sorry i don't get what your saying
#4
there arent 8 A's in an octave, there are two. the open and the 2nd fret.
that little pattern he put up, A-A#-B-C-C#-D-D#-E-F-F#-G-G#-A, is the distance between the open A and the 2nd fret G.
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#5
Quote by quinny1089
you do know there are 12 notes in western music?


yeah, but if i play an A note and i count eight A notes down the fret board that is an octave?? then i don't get why you can play it at less than eight, like he was saying
#6
If you play an A with 8 other As in between that'd be like 9 octaves up. An octave is just 6 whole steps or 12 half steps above a note (12 frets on a guitar). It's like a 12th fret harmonic except you fret the note.
#7
Quote by tyler112493
there arent 8 A's in an octave, there are two. the open and the 2nd fret.
that little pattern he put up, A-A#-B-C-C#-D-D#-E-F-F#-G-G#-A, is the distance between the open A and the 2nd fret G.


ok i thought it was eight A notes. but any ways that would just get me from an open 5th string to fifth string 12th fret? is that an octave
#8
Quote by kayvon1
yeah, but if i play an A note and i count eight A notes down the fret board that is an octave?? then i don't get why you can play it at less than eight, like he was saying

Well if you're at an A on the guitar, and you go down 8 actual A notes, that's more than 1 octave. Play the 12th fret on the A string and go down 12 steps. You hit the open A which is an octave lower.
#9
There are two kinds of notes, naturals (A,B,C, etc.) and then accidentals (A#/Bb, etc.). It's best to think of these notes in a cycle, because as you go past a note you again come back around to it. To do come back around to the same note, you have to go through all of the natural, AND the accidental notes. I think that you're only thinking about the naturals, and dismissing the accidentals. That's how you come to 12 notes instead of 8.
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#10
You don't count eight A notes down the fretboard. You count 12 semitones. Semitones are half steps. For example, A string 1 fret and 2nd fret is a half step apart. If you play A string open, you count 12 semitones (12 frets) all the way to fret 12 which is A note. But playing the note on the A string 12th fret is also the same as playing D string 7th fret or G string 2nd fret.
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#11
Quote by HighPotency
If you play an A with 8 other As in between that'd be like 9 octaves up. An octave is just 6 whole steps or 12 half steps above a note (12 frets on a guitar). It's like a 12th fret harmonic except you fret the note.


really? so a the twelfth fret an its correspondibg open string is an octave? they dont sound the same tone
#12
yes, the distance beetween an open fret and the 12th fret is called an octave. If I play an A open, and an A at 12, the 12th fret A is higher but still the same note, hence it is an octave up.
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#15
A standard Western scale conatins seven notes. Not surprisingly, they are called 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. That is the formula for the major scale, what I just wrote out. You can apply alterations to change the scale; 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 is the formula for the minor scale.

So in C major, we play C D E F G A B as our 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. After that final B note, the scale repeats, C D E F G A B C D E F G A B, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8. I've bolded from where the 8 comes.

Even if you have no idea why the C major scale contains those notes, accept that it does and then the 8 will make sense. If you want to see how scales are formed, read my sig.
#17
we respond fast to questions like these because they are simple to answer. A lot of us shy away from tougher questions, and they get only a few responses.
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#18
Construct a Major Scale:

A scale is a way of climbing through the 12 tones outlined above.

The most important scale is the Major Scale. It consists of taking seven steps to climb from one note to the next note of the same pitch.

The seven steps are always the same in the Major Scale. They are:
Whole Step - Whole Step - Half Step - Whole Step - Whole Step - Whole Step - Half Step.
abbreviated = W W H W W W H

A Whole Step is moving up two frets or two places along the twelve notes from the posts above. It is sometimes called a Whole Tone or just a Tone.

A Half Step is moving up one fret or one place along the twelve notes from the posts above. It is sometimes called a Half Tone or Semitone.

To constuct a specific Major Scale - say an A Major Scale - we start on the A. That is our first degree or the root of our Major Scale. Then we list our 12 chromatic notes and use the step pattern to climb through to the next A.

Starting on A and moving up a Whole tone we arrive at B. B is the second degree of the A Major Scale.
From B we move up another Whole Tone and arrive at C#. C# is the third degree of the A Major Scale.
From C# we move up a Half Tone and arrive at D. D is the fourth degree of the A Major Scale
From D we move up a Whole Tone and arrive at E. E is the fifth degree of the A Major Scale.
From E we move up a Whole Tone and arrive at F#. F# is the sixth degree of the A Major Scale.
From F# we move up a Whole Tone and arrive at G#. G# is the seventh degree of the A Major Scale.
From G# we move up the final step which is a Half Step to get back to A. A is the 8th degree of the Major Scale hence the name octave.
[B]1[/B]  2  3  4  5  6  7  [B]8[/B]
[B]A[/B]  B  C# D  E  F# G# [B]A[/B]
A ->A = Octave
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Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 17, 2008,