#1
Bought a LTD ex-400 for about 2-3 weeks ago and for some reason it keeps tuning the strings all the time. When I don't play for a while and then check how it's tuned, every string has tuned itself up or down (mostly up) by itself! I've changed strings once and it somewhat got better but still not good. Anyone know why? Oh, and it's not really intonated, but doubt it's because of that but I don't know, so...
#2
Different temps, humidity, and even air pressure in your house, office, studio, etc etc can and will affect the strings.
#4
Quote by MAYNARD
Different temps, humidity, and even air pressure in your house, office, studio, etc etc can and will affect the strings.



hmm, it is quite cold in our house but my other 2 guitars aren't affected as much as the LTD... but I'm not really sure it's those things your normaly tune with since I've cheched that they don't move
#5
Quote by kmbuchamushroom
And here I was getting all excited about magic strings I would never have to tune...



Hehe that would be somewhat awesome
#6
Quote by kmbuchamushroom
And here I was getting all excited about magic strings I would never have to tune...


This.

I was thinking, "ZOMG supernatural phenomenon!!"
#7
its normal. if your strings haven't changed that much it means its a pretty good guitar.
like my schecter, only the g string seems to go out.
#8
Quote by GaijinFoot
its normal. if your strings haven't changed that much it means its a pretty good guitar.
like my schecter, only the g string seems to go out.



For me it's like every string and really annoying that I have to tune it again and again each time I want to play AND when I'm playing!
#9
Quote by groose
hmm, it is quite cold in our house but my other 2 guitars aren't affected as much as the LTD... but I'm not really sure it's those things your normaly tune with since I've cheched that they don't move

My rig is in my basement and the same thing happens to me. I just figure that the coldness causes the hardware to shrink slightly, thus increasing the tension on the strings. Just my guess if that's the case, the different hardware on your guitars will obviously be effected on different extents based on the exact composition of the bridge/tuners/strings etc.
Baron K2 SE 120
MILLS 4x12 Afterburner
Eventide TimeFactor Delays
ISP Pro Rack G Noise Suppressor
BKP Warpig pickups
Last edited by kayman121 at Sep 18, 2008,
#10
Quote by kayman121
My rig is in my basement and the same thing happens to me. I just figure that the coldness causes the hardware to shrink slightly, thus increasing the tension on the strings. Just my guess if that's the case, the different hardware on your guitars will obviously be effected on different extents based on the exact composition of the bridge/tuners/strings etc.

my rig is also in my basement and i have the same problem i have to tune alot but i don't care it's not bottering me anymore so... but with some strings i have to tune more then others
Gear:
Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
MXR Dime Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
ISP Decimator
EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks
#12
I keep my house at 68 degrees and my guitars never go out of tune.
None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free.
#13
Quote by timi_hendrix
Have you stretched the strings?

+1. 9/10 times, this solves the issue. None of my guitars drift unless they are left to set for a couple weeks, and that is in some fair variances of temp and humidity. The construction of the guitar can play a part in it though.
#14
Put some pencil lead in the nut where the strings sit. Sometimes nuts restrict the proper movement of the strings, so say if you tune down, start playing and play a really high bend, the "slack" above the nut will be equalized in your string. Lead is a dry lubricant and helps with this problem.
#15
Quote by nzeese
Put some pencil lead in the nut where the strings sit. Sometimes nuts restrict the proper movement of the strings, so say if you tune down, start playing and play a really high bend, the "slack" above the nut will be equalized in your string. Lead is a dry lubricant and helps with this problem.


Damn, you learn something new every day!

Another trick you can use is freezing your strings before you put them on. Just put the new package in the freezer for a few hours. Years and years ago someone recommended that to me and it works! I was gigging alot back then and I often had to string my guitars 10 minutes befor showtime. So, it was perfect for me to just slap them on and go! I guess the cold stretches the metal before-hand so you wont have to stretch them yourself and they stay in tune for the life of the string.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional Pro II
Jackson Soloist SL2H
Schecter Hellraiser Solo 6
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Top
Epiphone AJ200SCE Acoustic-Electric
Epiphone Embassy
Vintage Audition Mystery Guitar
B-52 AT100
Vox VT80
#16
I belive its most humidity that effects the guitars most espically ones with lower action such as the LTD ex-400

Wood expands a lot when its in a humid location and shrinks when in lower humidity locations.
My guitar (Strat style PRS SE EG) seems to tune up as well even though we have a somewhat controlled humidity in the house. After playing a song for a few minutes the tune will go down.
I tend to play a little, tune dead on, then it stays like that for the day.

Properly set your strings after putting them on and make sure you are installing them correctly. That Tune-o-matic bridge can stump some players when it comes to restringing..
Last edited by moody07747 at Sep 18, 2008,
#17
Metal shrinks and expands when cooled and heated. When you're playing, the heat released from your hands warms the strings and the bridge up causing them to expand. When you leave the guitar in the cold room, the metal cools and shrinks. The constant shrinking and expanding causes change in tension on the strings, thus causing the strings to go out of tune.