#1
For my music theory class i have to write a harmonic series to the 7th degree, built on D. i dont know what that means lol. i assume it has something to do with intervals since the rest of the lesson was on intervals, and i also assume that built on D means my first note should be a D. and the 7th degree would mean 7 notes?? Will someone please explain this to me please. thanks.
#2
take a D minor scale, so starting with D go up a Whole step, Half step, Whole, whole, half, A STEP AND A HALF, and then back to D (whole). thats how you construct a Dm Harmonic. as opposed to a natural minor, which the step and a half would be a whole step.

EDIT: to make life easier, this is Dm Harmonic:
D E F G A Bb C# D
My Gear:
Gibson Faded Flying V
"Dante's Inferno" Iceman
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe 112
etc.




Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#3
^ Those are the steps in a harmonic minor scale.. the harmonic series has something to do with doubling frequencies or something like that, I'm not sure though so I'm not much help. But it's not a harmonic minor scale
#7
The harmonic series are the notes you can get from one string just using harmonics, or from a brass instrument just with the lips. They follow a pattern of gradually decreasing intervals:

Octave, fifth, fourth, major third, minor third, flat minor third, sharp major second and so on

Starting on D:

D - Starting pitch
D - Up an octave
A - Up a fifth
D - Up a fourth
F# - Up a major third
A - Up a minor third
C (half flat) - Up a flat minor third
D - Up a sharp major second

The reason that this series exists is to do with the perception of pitch not being linear with frequency.
#8
^This man has it.

TS: It's also called the "overtone series", and if you have to write it to the seventh degree then you'll need seven notes, up to the flat m3. An easy way to remember the first six partials is just to remember the formula of P8 P5 P4 M3 m3, and then after that you get into the strange flat and sharp intervals.
#9
wow it seems really odd that my music teacher would ask me to do this on my second assingment... thanks though lol..
#10
Quote by :-D
^This man has it.

TS: It's also called the "overtone series", and if you have to write it to the seventh degree then you'll need seven notes, up to the flat m3. An easy way to remember the first six partials is just to remember the formula of P8 P5 P4 M3 m3, and then after that you get into the strange flat and sharp intervals.


Ive heard lydian dominant being referred to as the "overtone" scale
anything to do with this?
or is it irrelevant?
#13
Quote by Punkismygod
I don't get the explanation can someone explain is for a dummy?

Well, basically the idea is that no matter what note you hit, there's never only one note produced. For example, if you play a C, you have the fundamental note that you actually played, which is also the first partial of the overtone series as was described above. The overtone or harmonic series just refers to the other notes that actually sound at the same time you play the fundamental note.

Does that make it any clearer?
#14


This may help clear it up if you're still having problems with it.
SPAM
Stock Gibson Pickups from a 2005 V, I think they're a 498T and 500T set FS/FT
Duncan Distortion (regular spaced) FS

Looking for: an acoustic, recording gear, or $
#15
Quote by :-D
Well, basically the idea is that no matter what note you hit, there's never only one note produced. For example, if you play a C, you have the fundamental note that you actually played, which is also the first partial of the overtone series as was described above. The overtone or harmonic series just refers to the other notes that actually sound at the same time you play the fundamental note.

Does that make it any clearer?


Ya this explained me, and the the answer above. thanks guys!
鋼の錬金術師
#16
Ive heard lydian dominant being referred to as the "overtone" scale
anything to do with this?
or is it irrelevant?



The first scalar movement in the overtone series is lydian dominant I believe...
#17
the "overtone" theory is the "X-Files" of music-so to speak...in jazz harmony it is explored in the extended altered dominate chords and their upper partials...( i know ... yikes)

another way of saying it is: your playing in more than one key at a time...in fact your playing in all keys at once...

it takes time and alot of "experimentation" with different chord voicing and movement (voice leading) to see the dynamics of overtones..and how they work...

on guitar..the altered dominate jazz chord voicing and naming become blurred because of the overtones...a altered minor chord can be a dominate chord or even an altered major chord and can resolve into several different keys at different points of a progression and still sound "modal" even with extreme "out sounding" chord tones...

(im so sorry i ever asked about the #11th tone when i was learning jazz theory)

hoping that some of you will find the study of overtones an open door to playing music with more freedom than you can ever imagine...it takes alot of effort and will power...but worth it when you improvise with no limits...

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Sep 20, 2008,