#1
I'm a vocalist for a newly formed band and it's going to be my first "real" band. We do actually plan on playing at local venues in the mid-far future and basically, I need to know what setup would be good for me as a vocalist. Here's what I'm considering (keep in mind, im trying to get the most bang for the buck):

I'm currently looking at these for cabs. http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Harbinger-HX152-Dual-15-2Way-Speaker-Cabinet?sku=600074 It seems pretty decent and the reviews are good.

This for a mixer. (i'm the only vocalist so we dont need a million mic ports) http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Tapco-Mix.60-Compact-Mixer?sku=630263

And last but not least the Shure SM58

So my real question is: Is this a decent setup for a beginner vocalist? And is there anything I'm leaving out? I'm a beginner when it comes to proper equipment to get my voice heard over a band.

Help without flamming would be appreciated!
#2
Essentially most low end PAs will do what you want them to do (be as loud/louder than the band). An SM58 is the obvious first choice for a mic for good reasons: its durable, it can handle pretty high SPLs and it's relatively cheap. If you're just starting out you don't need anything flashy. One thing to watch out for with the SM58 is the doppeler effect (though you will need to watch out for that in all mics really) as it can kick in pretty quickly on a 58.
#4
Ok firstly, i spelt it wrong, its spelt "Doppler" (Sorry)

In this instance the Doppler Effect is when a sound source (Your voice) moves too close (closer) to a transducer (the mic) and creates a sudden, large bass boost. This is usually seen when someone is singing higher frequencies (high notes). You know when you see a vocalist moving the mic away from their face for a particularly high note? Thats so the doppler effect doesnt kick in, which would obviously give the bass boost which essentially just makes a loud hum and you can't hear anything else.

The main danger is that if you can't hear your vocals perfectly, i.e if you don't have any monitors, you won't notice but everyone else will. Just something to watch really, but your mic technique in general will improve as you practice vocals with a mic.

Glad I could be of assistance before, hope this helps aswell
#5
While that may all be true, the doppler effect is the sonic phenemonan where an oncoming car will have a different sound to the stationary listener than it will when it is driving away (assume you are standing along a road). The car moves the air in front of it and that compresses the sound waves and alightly alters the pitch from the perspective of the stationary listener.
#6
That is also bangoodcharlotte, it's the same thing essentially as the car would be the sound source and obviously your ears are the transducer
#7
The rig you have picked out won't work...

The cabinets are not powered. With only a mixer you will need a power amp.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation/mackie-amplifiers-mixers-speakers?N=100001+201188

This might work better, or something like it... The top 2 items on this page, the powered speakers plus a mixer... easy rig to use. The Mackie 808S Head plus the non-powered speakers would be another good choice. If it is for vocals only I would avoid those big cabinets. No real benefit and a pain to haul and store.

The Mackies are also shaped to sit on their sides to be used as monitors. So, if you guys get a bigger rig for the mains, just move the Mackies to the floor.

Mackie or Yamaha - cheap, tough, sounds good. Stay away from Behringer! Anchors with knobs...

The effect KennghisTron refers to is actually the "proximity effect." A mic will have more bass response if the sound source is closer. Low frequencies require more energy to move across a distance. That is actually a benefit if you learn to control it.

The "Doppler effect" is the apparent change in pitch of a moving sound source. Imagine an ambulance approaching. As it passes the pitch suddenly drops. On approach the wavelength was being compressed, making it sound higher. As it leaves the wavelength is being expanded, making it sound lower.

Good luck.
#9
Yea, that rig will do, but it won't be loud. If you guys are an acoustic band, or "electric, but quiet," then it should work. Go down to the local music shop and chat with them about it. Most places are willing to give you a free education if you plan on buying from them. And, around here, most shops will match MF prices, or get close enough to justify keeping the money local.

There's a lot to be said for building a relationship with the local music stores. You hope to be supported by the people in your town. They feel the same.
#11
The Yamaha rig will be MUCH better. Behringer is the single worst, most poorly designed crap I have ever seen. They don not even repair stuff. They just replace it. It is "unrepairable" because the cost would be greater than just buying another one. IT ABSOLUTELY SUCKS!!!

The Yamaha will not be real loud, but it will sound good, and you could build on it. The Behringer is just plain useless....
#12
Quote by KennghisTron
Ok firstly, i spelt it wrong, its spelt "Doppler" (Sorry)

In this instance the Doppler Effect is when a sound source (Your voice) moves too close (closer) to a transducer (the mic) and creates a sudden, large bass boost. This is usually seen when someone is singing higher frequencies (high notes). You know when you see a vocalist moving the mic away from their face for a particularly high note? Thats so the doppler effect doesnt kick in, which would obviously give the bass boost which essentially just makes a loud hum and you can't hear anything else.

The main danger is that if you can't hear your vocals perfectly, i.e if you don't have any monitors, you won't notice but everyone else will. Just something to watch really, but your mic technique in general will improve as you practice vocals with a mic.

Glad I could be of assistance before, hope this helps aswell


I believe what your referring to is the "proximity effect". Pretty much every mic has this "problem", but it's more a matter of physics than a problem with the equipment. The Doppler Effect, as was explained earlier, is a different phenomenon.
#13
Quote by revtfunk
The Yamaha rig will be MUCH better. Behringer is the single worst, most poorly designed crap I have ever seen. They don not even repair stuff. They just replace it. It is "unrepairable" because the cost would be greater than just buying another one. IT ABSOLUTELY SUCKS!!!

The Yamaha will not be real loud, but it will sound good, and you could build on it. The Behringer is just plain useless....


But, but, but... it's GERMAN!!! How could it be bad?