#1
Yep, the manager at the place where my band rents out our studio place wants to start offering lessons, and thanks to some killer rep I've built up over the last year or so, it looks like I'm going to be a professional Electric Bass teacher . This makes me very excited, as I figure if I can get 10-15 students I'll be able to quit my job and be one happy guy, making way more working less and doing something I love. Plus, meeting a girl and saying "I'm a private bass instructor" will be so much cooler than "I work the night shift at a gas station"

That being said, I need to make sure I'm the best I can be at it, I know a few people here have/are done/doing the professional teacher thing, and any general advice would be greatly appreciated. I know more than enough about simplifying concepts and general "What to teach" principles, what I'm looking for is some curriculum suggestions and general "Tools of the Trade" type info. What I've planned out so far is more or less what my old teachers did with me, but with me being the teacher instead of the student. However I'm sure that I'm underestimating the difficulty a bit.

Should I keep a journal detailing each of my student's progress/skill level? I know I'll be teaching a lot out of formal Hal Leonard type books, but how much of the coursework can I actually use out of those without boring my students into quitting? How different do I need to make hour long classes compared to half-hour long classes? Do I just double the length of everything? I have use of a drum kit and can play drums, would it be wise to play drums with my students so I can work as a metronome and get them to get accustomed to playing with a drummer? So many questions and possibilities!

Here's a basic outline of what I'm thinking an hour-lesson will be:

Warm Up for 5-10 minutes, Scales, Chromatic Runs, etc.
Book Work for 20 minutes or so
15-20 minutes of either learning a song, jamming, or anything else that could be inventive and fun
10-15 minutes of learning a new exercise/scale/technique/concept/theory.
*Obviously this is subject to change depending on the student*

Thoughts? Ideas? Congratafuckinlations? I'll take any of 'em.
When you were born, you cried, and the world rejoiced. Live your life in such a manner that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice.
Kabir
#3
keep a diary of what you do with the kid,

rite the homework on it and what they learnt in that class for you and the kid so you can pull it out next lesson and see what you did last lesson and continue from that and check their homework
Originally Posted by smb
I'm an arrogant bastard - I thought I was good before I'd plucked a note. I was right, of course.

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#7
maybe less theory and more doing songs that they like?

+ I wouldn't recommend holding up to that scheme always.

Seen as in the beginning I'd do even less theory and more how to play bass with easy songs they like.

but congratulations!!
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#8
Remember, you should be teaching them proper technique. I don't know how you play, but don't teach the "do whatever you want" method of technique, otherwise you're irrelevant as a teacher. Also, I can almost guarantee a newer student wouldn't be comfortable jamming or being creative for 15 minutes.
So remember, you have to tailor your lessons to what the kid wants to, and is able to do. You can't force-feed someone theory if they don't want to learn it, but you can sneak it in there without them even knowing, with the scales of the song how to play over the chords etc. Oh, and always know what you're talking about. Don't start talking about something you don't have all the information on.
Your lessons shouldn't be so scheduled, in my opinion. I think you should maybe do a warm-up and then move into what the kid wants to do next and when your lesson takes you somewhere else, go there and if he needs more book work stay with it. Remember, you can teach theory, exercises, sight-reading and technique out of a book if you know the subjects well enough to point some stuff out.

That's all of the jumbled, out of order thoughts I can put down right now.
#9
Motivate them to learn how to read music. Do this especially with the new students. Learning to read isn't something a teacher can FORCE you to do, you have to just spend lots of time reading.

And congratu****inlations.
#10
Quote by UndeadPaperclip
Plus, meeting a girl and saying "I'm a private bass instructor" will be so much cooler than "I work the night shift at a gas station"

Broke is broke, no matter how you word it!!

But that's really cool. Sounds like it'd be fun and rewarding.

But don't forget that fretting hand. I still think anyone who plays fretted properly can play fretless with little more than an afternoon's learning curve.
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#11
Quote by thefitz
Broke is broke, no matter how you word it!!

But that's really cool. Sounds like it'd be fun and rewarding.

But don't forget that fretting hand. I still think anyone who plays fretted properly can play fretless with little more than an afternoon's learning curve.

sweet. it took me 3 hours to get fretless down enough to sound like it should. I'm doing something right.

make sure you teach technique as soon as possible. and get that kid into some chorded lyrics, even if it's just Folsom Prison Blues or something like that.
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HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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#13
Congratulations man, I'd love to actually teach music to others some day. But a new student might not be so keen on Jamming, But still jamming is fun as hell lol.

Originally Posted by Draekon

A song im very good at is Raining Blood!
"RAINING BLOOD! from a lacerated sky! Bleed is Horror! I bleed destruction, and now i shall REIGN IN BLOOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
Is that what he says?
#14
I think using the drum kit is a good idea, and try and talk to your old teachers if you need some help.
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#15
I know a drum teacher who teaches the student something, then picks his guitar and plays guitar riffs with them to help them to learn to play with people. So playings the drums would be a good idea =).

and Congratulations
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
what would that be called? a Fibson with Gender confusion issues?
#16
Please don't follow some strict schedule for each class.

IMO, you should make the lessons more casual, but still where you teach them more than enough.
#17
Guys guys, i wasn't actually considering following that strict schedule to the T for every single student (See: "Basic outline" and "Subject to Change depending on the student"), I was just throwing out a general idea for above first-lesson students.

Quote by thefitz

Broke is broke, no matter how you word it!!


That may be true, but ya know... shut up.
When you were born, you cried, and the world rejoiced. Live your life in such a manner that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice.
Kabir
#18
^that's really mature. and creative.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#19
How's your ear? Because sometimes I would bring a song and the teacher could help me learn it by ear, so if you have a good enough ear you could do that.
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#20
Teach them song they like, some technique, and when they get stuck and can't figure anything out, they come to you for theory.
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