#1
Okay, so I spent some time learning the 5 shapes of the Minor Pentatonic scale. Now I'm learning the Major Pentatonic scale, and I've noticed the shapes are exactly the same? Shouldn't that mean that the Major and Minor Pentatonic scales are exactly the same thing?
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#2
yupp its all bout the root note and how you play each that's give them different sounds..and remember that relative to a key the minor and major pents are same shapes in diff places so they sound nothing alike
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#3
Natural minor is a mode of the Major scale. Look for a lesson on modes and it should become clear. Basically it's the same scale, but played from a different starting (root) note.
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#4
The shapes for a lot of scales are exactly the same, howeve the scales themselves are very different - scales are not patterns or box shapes, the patterns are simply where a particular scale happens to appear on the guitar.

Read the Crusade articles by Josh Urban in the Columns section and get some basic theory knowledge under your belt, it'll save you a lot of time and confusion when trying to learn scales.
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#5
Quote by estranged_g_n_r
Okay, so I spent some time learning the 5 shapes of the Minor Pentatonic scale. Now I'm learning the Major Pentatonic scale, and I've noticed the shapes are exactly the same? Shouldn't that mean that the Major and Minor Pentatonic scales are exactly the same thing?

No. A Major Pentatonic is missing the fourth and seventh degrees. The Minor Pentatonic is missing the second and sixth degrees and has a flat third and seventh. I think that's quite a significant difference.

But as was said above one is a mode of the other so learning the five shapes of one will give you the five shapes of the other. The key lies in identifying root notes within the shape.

Shapes are definitely useful but make sure you learn the names of the notes and the scale degree of each shape as well.
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
The shapes for a lot of scales are exactly the same, howeve the scales themselves are very different - scales are not patterns or box shapes, the patterns are simply where a particular scale happens to appear on the guitar.

Read the Crusade articles by Josh Urban in the Columns section and get some basic theory knowledge under your belt, it'll save you a lot of time and confusion when trying to learn scales.


Okay, I think I understand. I've got those Crusade articles bookmarked and will read them when I have some spare time . Thanks .
You are like a hurricane
There's calm in your eye.
And I'm gettin' blown away
To somewhere safer
where the feeling stays.
I want to love you but
I'm getting blown away.